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2014–2015 RPP Supplementary Tables

These tables are provided electronically as part of the Department's 2014-2015 RPP submission to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

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Details of Transfer Payment Programs


Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs under $5 million

Disclosure of TPPs under $5 million
Name of TPPProgram, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-ProgramMain ObjectiveEnd Date of TPP, if applicableType of TP
(G, C)
Planned Spending for 2014–15Fiscal Year of Last Completed EvaluationGeneral Targeted Recipient Group
Assessed contribution for Canada’s share of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) budget3.2.2 – International Climate Change and Clean Air PartnershipsTo enable Canada’s obligation to cost-share the core and projected expenses of the CEC.N/AC$3,230,0002012–13Commission for Environmental Cooperation
Grants and contributions under the Montreal Protocol3.2.2 – International Climate Change and Clean Air PartnershipsUnder the rules of the Montreal Protocol, Canada has the option of directing up to 20% of its annual contribution to the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol (MFMP) towards support for bilateral or regional projects in developing countries, which helps them reduce their consumption or production of ozone-depleting substances (ODS).N/AG$2,000,0002012–13Developing country governments, universities, training institutes that have signed the Montreal Protocol, and third‑party delivery agents
EcoAction 200 – Community Funding Service1.3.3.1 – EcoAction Community FundingEnable community-based groups to achieve environmental results related to departmental priorities and thereby reduce risks to human health and the environment.N/AC$4,525,0002013–14Non-profit and non-governmental groups, service clubs, associations, Aboriginal organizations
Contributions to support Substances and Waste Management

3.1.1 – Substances Management

3.1.3 – Marine Pollution

To encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to reduce threats to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances and waste.N/AC$1,760,2192009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)Canadian or international not-for-profit organizations, Aboriginal organizations, other levels of government
Contributions to Support Water Resources1.2.1 – Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems HealthTo encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to minimize threats to, and maintain the sustainability of, Canada’s water resources and aquatic ecosystems.N/AC$604,5952009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)Canadian or international not-for-profit, Aboriginal organizations, individuals, for‑profit organizations and other levels of government
Grant to support Weather and Environmental Services2.1.1 – Weather Observations, Forecasts and WarningsThe purpose of this grant is to support research and the development of highly qualified experts in the scientific areas related to Environment Canada’s mandate, such as atmospheric study and climate change.N/AG$44,0002009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)Canadian and foreign researchers and students, domestic universities, domestic or international not-for-profit organizations and associations, and other levels of government
Contributions to support Weather and Environmental Services

2.1.1 – Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings

2.1.2 – Health-related Meteorological Information

2.1.3 – Climate Information, Predictions and Tools

To encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to enable Canadians to access, understand and use information on changing weather, water, climate and air quality conditions.

N/AC$2,177,4922009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)Canadian or international not-for-profit, Aboriginal organizations, individuals, for-profit organizations and other levels of government
Assessed contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development3.1.1 – Substances ManagementCanada is a signatory to this convention and is thus bound by the requirements of the international convention, including the obligation to pay the assessed contribution.N/AC$100,0002011–12 (Evaluation of Waste and Reduction Management)Convention on the Organisation for Economic Co‑operation and Development, Environment Directorate
Assessed contribution to the World Meteorological Organization2.1.1 – Weather Observations, Forecasts and WarningsCanada has been a member of the WMO since 1950 as one of the initial signatories to the convention. The annual assessed contribution is based on the U.N. Scale as agreed to every three years by the U.N. General Assembly and adapted, as is normal practice, to accommodate the varying membership of U.N. organizations. N/AC$2,167,7852009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)World Meteorological Organization
Assessed contribution to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)1.1.2.1 – Species at Risk OperationsCanada is a signatory to this convention and is thus bound by the requirements of the international convention, including the obligation to pay the assessed contribution.N/AC$190,0002009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)CITES Secretariat
Assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance1.1.4.1 – Habitat Conservation Partnerships

Canada has been a Contracting Party to the Ramsar Convention since 1981.

Annual membership dues are an obligation of the Parties based on terms agreed to at the Convention of the Parties.

N/AC$206,1402009–10 (Evaluation of Environment Canada’s Class Grants and Contributions)RAMSAR Convention Secretariat

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Contributions in Support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Start date: June 10, 2010

End date: Ongoing – Evaluation to be completed by March 31, 2015

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010–11

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Description: Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to maintain or restore wildlife populations, in particular migratory birds and species at risk, to target levels.

Expected Results: Projects funded under these terms and conditions will contribute, together with other departmental activities and the actions of others, to the following key expected results:

Applicable to all Sub-programs:
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators
a) Individuals and organizations are increasingly engaged in priority activities related to the conservation of wildlife, in particular migratory birds and species at risk.Total time invested by individuals in funded projects (person-years).
b) Increased Aboriginal participation in wildlife and habitat conservation.Number of Aboriginal organizations participating in funded projects related to migratory birds, species at risk or their habitats.
c) New knowledge and data produced by collaborating organizations contribute to the conservation of migratory birds, species at risk and their habitat.Proportion of species for which primary data to establish population status and trends are provided through funded projects.
d) Priority habitats for migratory birds and species at risk are conserved by partners through stewardship and protection.Land area conserved through funded projects.
e) Factors limiting priority species at risk and migratory bird populations are reduced by partners.Proportion of threats addressed through funded projects.
f) Increased collaboration within Canadian and international research and policy communities related to Environment Canada’s biodiversity priorities.Number of formal collaborations regarding transnational conservation issues undertaken or maintained as a direct result of funded projects.
g) Compliance with the requirements of the Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards.Canada and Competent Authorities (provinces and territories) remain compliant with the requirements of the Agreement.

Projects that have different Expected Results but that support the objectives of these terms and conditions may be undertaken. Evaluation and performance measurement of such projects, which tend to be unique and non-recurring, will focus on the specific Expected Results identified in individual funding agreements.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
 Forecast Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Total Grants$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Contributions$13.3$14.3$12.8$12.8
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Transfer Payments$13.3$14.3$12.8$12.8

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012–13 (Species at Risk Sub-Program and Biodiversity Policy and Priorities Sub-Program)

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: Evaluation for other specific programs will be completed by 2014–15.

General Targeted Recipient Group: Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Aboriginal organizations; research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; domestic or international for-profit organizations; and other levels of government.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Environment Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements; and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and useable manner: publicity in news media, information provided on the departmental website, letter-writing activities, and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.

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Contributions to Support Climate Change and Clean Air

Start date: June 10, 2010

End date: Ongoing – Evaluation to be completed by March 31, 2015

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010–11

Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air

Description: The purpose and overall objective of contributions made under these terms and conditions are toencourage and support international organizations and foreign states engaged in activities that advance international action, improve Canadian air quality, reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and promote change towards sustainable environmental development and policies.

Expected Results: Projects funded under these terms and conditions will contribute, together with other departmental activities and the actions of others, to the following key expected results:

Applicable to all Sub-programs:
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators
a) New knowledge and data produced by collaborating organizations contribute to improved air quality and/or reduced greenhouse gas emissions
  • Development of a national baseline of ambient and emission levels of targeted pollutants with sufficient scope and accuracy to enable the assessment of the effectiveness of the industrial strategy on air pollutant emissions.
  • Use of information developed through contribution agreements in determining air pollutant reduction targets.
  • Use of information developed through contribution agreements to enhance the understanding of the significance of a changing climate on air quality.
  • Percentage of research priorities (by program) implemented in whole or in part by funded projects.
  • Percentage of funded projects (by program) whose findings have been applied to Environment Canada research, operational models, policies, regulations or activities.
b) Verification of environmental claims of Canadian technologies
  • Annual number of verification certificates issued under the Canadian Environmental Technology Verification Program.
c) Mentoring services are available to small and medium-sized enterprises producing environmental technologies
  • Annual number of clients served by Canadian Environmental Technology Advancement Centres.
d) Engagement of international organizations that promote the reduction of emissions of air pollutants and/or greenhouse gases
  • Number of international partnerships or institutions related to the reduction of emissions of air pollutants and/or greenhouse gases in which the Government of Canada participates.
e) Engagement of partners, in particular the Canadian private sector, in projects that advance the role of clean technology in addressing emissions of air pollutants and/or greenhouse gases
  • Number and total value of projects in which Canada or Canadian private-sector firms participate.
  • Percentage of total project value provided by Canadian private-sector firms.
  • Number of individual Canadian firms participating.
f) Canada’s environmental interests and priorities are addressed by international institutions
  • Percentage of Canadian interventions and/or negotiating positions that are adopted by the United National Environment Programme (UNEP) United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) and/or incorporated into the UNEP biennial program of work and budget.
g) New information and analysis supporting the development of policy on sustainable development and the effective governance of environmental issues in Canada and internationally
  • Number of research publications on sustainable development policy or environmental governance (peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed) produced by non-governmental organizations in Canada.
h) Increased public access to information and research findings pertaining to sustainable development and environmental governance
  • Number of reports and other policy documents available to the public without charge through funded non-governmental organization websites.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
 Forecast Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Total Grants$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Contributions$9.3$8.1$8.1$5.8
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Transfer Payments$9.3$8.1$8.1$5.8

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2012–13 (Transportation Sector Emissions Sub-Sub-Program)

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: Evaluation for other specific programs will be completed by 2014–15.

General Targeted Recipient Group: Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Aboriginal organizations; research, academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; domestic or international for-profit organizations; and other levels of government.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Environment Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements, and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the Program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.

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Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP) for Species at Risk

Start date: August 20, 2000

End date: Program is ongoing

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2009–10

Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat, 1.1.2 Species at Risk and 1.1.2.3 Habitat Stewardship Program

Description: The purpose of the HSP is to contribute to the recovery of Endangered, Threatened and other Species of Concern, and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern, by engaging Canadians in conservation actions to benefit wildlife. The HSP fosters partnerships among organizations interested in the recovery of species at risk. It provides funding for on-the-ground activities that conserve or restore habitats for species at risk and other practical actions for the recovery of such species. The HSP enables non-governmental organizations, landowners, the private sector, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, community groups and other levels of government to plan, manage and complete projects that will achieve the program goal.

Expected Results: Important habitat is secured, protected, improved and/or restored to enhance the recovery of species at risk. Specifically, in 2014–15, it is expected that 10,000 ha of total land area and 100 km of shoreline will be improved or restored to benefit wildlife; 1,667 ha will be legally secured; 6,667 ha will be newly protected through voluntary conservation agreements; and 50,000 ha will be protected through renewed voluntary conservation agreements, in order to enhance the recovery of species at risk.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
 Forecast Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Total Grants$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Contributions$11.8$11.8$7.8$7.8
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Transfer Payments$11.8$11.8$7.8$7.8

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2009–10

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016–17 (when the Species at Risk Act comes up for evaluation again)

General Targeted Recipient Groups

  • Aboriginal organizations / First Nations councils
  • Educational or research institutions (universities, museums, zoos/aquariums)
  • Government agencies or Crown corporations (provincial/territorial/municipal)
  • Environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs)
  • Private-sector organizations (corporations/associations/utilities)
  • Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or non-profit organizations

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

  • Annually, the Department, in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada, issues a call for proposals.

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Grant to Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the NextGen Biofuels Fund (NGBF) and the Sustainable Development Technology Fund (SD Tech Fund).

Start date: September 30, 2007 for the Next Generation Biofuels Fund (NGBF), and March 26, 2001 for the SD Tech Fund

End date: September 30, 2027 (the last appropriation by Parliament will be in fiscal year 2014–15, with the last disbursement by SDTC by March 31, 2017) for the NGBF and June 30, 2017 for the SD Tech Fund

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2007–08 for NGBF and 2012-13 (Funding Agreement 4) for SD Tech Fund. Payments are both statutory and voted.

Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air, 3.2.3 Environmental Technology and 3.2.3.1 Sustainable Development Technologies

Description: SDTC is a not-for-profit foundation created by the Government of Canada, with a series of federal grants that now totals to $1.09 billion. As sponsoring departments for the federal government, Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada provide federal oversight of SDTC to ensure that it complies with the two funding agreements and the founding legislation.

SDTC manages two separate funds:

  • The SD Tech Fund ($590 million consisting of $550 million in up-front funding and an additional $40 million announced in Budget 2011) to provide financial support to projects that have the potential to advance sustainable development, including technologies to address climate change, clean air, and water and soil quality issues
  • The NGBF ($500 million) to provide financial support towards the establishment of facilities producing next-generation renewable fuels at large demonstration scale

SDTC-funded projects are active in all major Canadian economic sectors, including energy exploration and production, power generation, energy utilization, transportation, agriculture, forestry and wood products, and waste management.

Expected Results: SDTC has released its corporate plan which provided the Expected Results and actions and a forecast for 2014 for both the SD Tech Fund and the NGBF. It includes a disbursement plan, planned administration expenditures, objectives and proposed actions, an investment update, an operating strategy, and performance expectations. For the SD Tech Fund, the corporate plan outlines 9 areas of activities that support one or more of the primary goals of the foundation. These activities include project funding, creation of market consortia, enabling market entry for technologies and others. NGBF will focus on progressing approved projects to final investment decisions. Projects currently under due diligence will be advanced through the Project Assurance Process in order to proceed towards applications for funding.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
 Forecast Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Total Statutory Funds$0$79.3$0$0
Total Grants (SD Tech fund)Footnote 1$0$12.5$3.0$3.0
Total Grants (NGBF)Footnote 2$50.0$25.0$0$0
Total Transfer payments$50.0$116.8$3.0$3.0

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Some funds have already flowed to SDTC’s SD Tech Fund in prior years; therefore, please also see the Up-Front Multi Year Funding for SDTC table.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Some funds have already flowed to SDTC’s NGBF in prior years; therefore, please also see the Up-Front Multi Year Funding for SDTC table.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: The first of three interim evaluations that SDTC is required to conduct according to the NGBF funding agreement was officially completed and was submitted to Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada on November 30, 2012. The interim evaluation concluded that SDTC has established a rigorous due-diligence process and is actively engaging with existing and potential industry clients. For SD Tech Fund, SDTC completed its second interim evaluation in FY 2009–10, as required by the funding agreement (report issued June 30, 2009). In addition, in accordance with a requirement in the funding agreement, the government initiated a value-for-money (performance) audit in FY 2009-10 and the final report was issued July 29, 2011.

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016–17

General Targeted Recipient Group: For NGBF, for-profit corporations, partnerships, limited partnerships, or business trusts, with legal capacity in Canada and with access to expertise in Next-generation Renewable Fuels Production Pathways. For SDTC, for-profit corporations, not-for-profit corporations, partnerships, limited partnerships, business trusts, universities, colleges, research institutes or individual, with legal capacity in Canada and with expertise in sustainable development technology.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: This is responsibility of the Sustainable Development Technology Canada Foundation.

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Contributions to Support Sustainable Ecosystems

Start date: June 10, 2010

End date: Ongoing – Evaluation to be completed by March 31, 2015

Fiscal Year for Ts & Cs: 2010–11

Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems and 1.3.4 Ecosystems Initiatives

Description:  Contributions under the Sustainable Ecosystems Program encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to manage ecosystem resources in a manner consistent with ecosystem sustainability.

Expected Results: The purpose and overall objective of contributions made under these terms and conditions is to enhance or maintain the sustainability of ecosystems in Canada, through collaboration with other levels of government (provinces and territories as well as regional, municipal and local governments), Aboriginal peoples and other stakeholders (such as non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, industry and businesses).

Projects funded under these terms and conditions will contribute, together with other departmental activities and the actions of others, to the following key expected results:

Applicable to the Ecosystems Initiatives Sub-Program:
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators
Engagement of governments, citizens and stakeholders in the development and implementation of ecosystem-based management plans as well as in ecosystem governance processes
  • Percentage of planning units that have a functioning multi-stakeholder governance structure.
  • Percentage of planning units with a functioning multi-stakeholder governance structure where the governance structure includes all interests relevant to the identified environmental issues.
  • Percentage of planning units that have an ecosystem-based management plan that has been approved by the relevant multi-stakeholder governance structure.
  • Percentage of total costs of ecosystem initiatives multi-stakeholder governance structures that is contributed by Environment Canada.
Implementation of environmental remediation, protection and conservation projects required to meet the goals and objectives identified in ecosystem-based management plans or to achieve ecosystem objectives
  • Percentage of environmental issues identified in approved ecosystem-based management plans or by ecosystem governance processes that are addressed by funded projects.
  • Percentage of total estimated costs of all management actions identified in approved ecosystem-based management plans represented by funded projects.
  • Percentage of actions identified in approved ecosystem-based management plans or ecosystem governance processes that have been completed.
  • Percentage of the total value of funded projects contributed by Environment Canada.
Participation of individuals and organizations in activities contributing to the achievement of goals and objectives identified in ecosystem-based management plans or to achieve ecosystem objectives
  • Number of individual participants in projects or activities undertaken in support of approved ecosystem-based management plans or under the auspices of an ecosystem-based multi-stakeholder governance structure.
  • Number of organizational participants in projects or activities undertaken in support of approved ecosystem-based management plans or under the auspices of an ecosystem-based multi-stakeholder governance structure.
Applicable to all Sub-Programs:
Expected ResultsPerformance Indicators
New knowledge and data produced by collaborating organizations contribute to the management and sustainability of Canadian ecosystems
  • Percentage of research priorities (by program) implemented in whole or in part by funded projects.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
 Forecast Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Total Grants$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Contributions$13.8$15.6$15.3$14.6
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments$0.0$0.0$0.0$0.0
Total Transfer Payments$13.8$15.6$15.3$14.6

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010–11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation (Continuation, Amendment, Termination, Pending, or N/A): Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2014–15

General Targeted Recipient Group: Domestic or international not-for-profit organizations; domestic or international Aboriginal organizations; research and academic and educational institutions; Canadian or foreign individuals; domestic or international for-profit organizations; and other levels of government.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Environment Canada engages applicants and recipients under this program in two ways: applicants through applications related to specific program elements, and recipients through single or named recipients identified on the basis of their unique ability to address targeted program results. The Department employs one or a combination of the following initiatives to provide access to the program in a clear, understandable and accessible manner: publicity in news media; information provided on the departmental website; letter-writing activities; and meetings with targeted recipient communities. Administrative requirements have been tailored to evaluated risk levels, and efficiency is being addressed through simplified agreement templates.

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Up-Front Multi-Year Funding


Clayoquot Biosphere Trust

Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program and Sub-Program: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems, 1.3.3 Community Engagement

Name of recipient: Clayoquot Biosphere Trust

Start date: February 2000

End date: In perpetuity

Description: Creation of an endowment fund for the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust (CBT), which is the cornerstone of the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. The CBT will use the income from the endowment fund to support local research, education and training in the Biosphere Reserve region.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (millions)
Total FundingPrior Years’ FundingPlanned Funding
2014–15
Planned Funding
2015–16
Planned Funding
2016–17
$12.0$12.0 (in 2000)$0.0$0.0$0.0

Summary of annual plans of recipient:

During 2014–15, the CBT will focus on the following objectives and deliverables:

  • Develop and nurture youth ambassadors through a field-trip program based on stewardship and philanthropy.
  • Deliver sustainability studies, grades 11 and 12, at Ucluelet Secondary School. This course of studies was developed by the CBT and accredited by School District 70.
  • Implement a Board-led, multi-year strategy and a fundraising campaign to support the establishment of a permanent biosphere centre.
  • Deliver a $50,000 call for projects focused on new biosphere priorities.
  • Monitor community health issues identified through the Vital Signs 2012 report.
  • Maintain the CBT/Genus Scholarship Program.

Link to recipient’s site: www.clayoquotbiosphere.org

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Green Municipal Fund (GMF)

Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air, 3.2.3 Environmental Technology and 3.2.3.2 Environmental Technology Innovation

Name of recipient: Green Municipal Fund (GMF)

Start date: February 2000

End date: In perpetuity

Description: The Green Municipal Fund (GMF) is a $550-million revolving fund administered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) that supports grants, loans and loan guarantees to encourage investment in environmental municipal projects. The Government of Canada endowed the FCM with a total of $550 million for this initiative through a series of budget decisions from 2000 to 2005.

The GMF was established to have a positive impact on the health and the quality of life of Canadians by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving local air, water and soil quality and promoting renewable energy by supporting environmental studies and projects within the municipal sector. Eligible projects may fall into one or more of the following categories: energy, water, waste, sustainable transportation, brownfields, or integrated community projects. The amount of $150 million is to be used exclusively to support brownfield remediation and redevelopment.

The amount of GMF financing available to municipalities is directly related to the environmental benefits and/or innovation of the projects undertaken, with grant/loan combinations of up to 80% of eligible costs available for capital projects with exceptional environmental benefits.        

As stipulated in the GMF Funding Agreement between the FCM and the Government of Canada, the FCM has created two advisory bodies: the GMF Council and the Peer Review Committee.

The GMF Council’s role is to assist the FCM Board of Directors--the decision-making body for the GMF--in approving projects proposed by municipalities. The 15-member GMF Council includes five federal members: two from Environment Canada, two from Natural Resources Canada and one from Transport Canada. All federal members are appointed by the FCM Board of Directors based on recommendations from the Minister of the Environment.

Environment Canada peer reviewers provide the GMF and federal Council Members with expert environmental science and technology advice and they evaluate funding proposals.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding by Environment CanadaFootnote 1(millions)
Total FundingPrior Years’ FundingPlanned Funding
2014–15
Planned Funding
2015–16
Planned Funding
2016–17
$275.0$275.0$0.0$0.0$0.0

Footnotes

Footnote 1

All amounts in this table represent the amounts transferred to the GMF by Environment Canada. An equivalent amount was transferred by Natural Resources Canada for a total of $550 million.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Summary of annual plans of recipient: The GMF’s Annual Statement of Plans and Objectives (ASPO) for 2014–15 will be submitted to the Minister on March 30, 2014. The GMF’s most recent ASPO 2013–14 states that the Expected Results for fiscal year 2013–14 include the following:

Grants for sustainable community plans, feasibility studies and field tests
After March 31, 2009, the FCM must aim to commit $6 to $8 million in grants for sustainable community plans, feasibility studies and field tests.

In fulfillment of this requirement, the FCM is aiming to approve a total of $6 million for plans, feasibility studies and field tests in 2013–14.

Loans and grants for capital projects
The FCM offers a combination of grants and low-interest loans in support of capital projects. Grants are only offered in combination with loans. Under the Funding Agreement, the FCM must aim to commit $50 to $70 million per year in loans. Up to March 31, 2009, the FCM may commit $7 to $10 million per year in grants to capital projects, and $5 to $6 million thereafter. The 2013–14 ASPO indicates that the FCM is aiming to approve $65 million in loans and $5 million in grants for capital projects in the energy, transportation, waste and water sectors. It also indicates that the FCM is aiming to commit 30% of the value of the Fund Assets for brownfield projects. Under the provisions of the Funding Agreement, brownfield projects are not eligible for grants.

Performance measures
To measure and demonstrate the qualitative, quantitative, short-term and long-term success of the GMF, the planned activities for 2013–14 include the following:

  • Capacity building: Encourage Canadian municipalities to use the knowledge, networks and tools provided by the GMF to develop their internal capacity to achieve their sustainability goals.
  • Leveraging partnerships and brokering: Extend the reach of GMF funding and knowledge to achieve greater overall impact.
  • Performance measurement: Establish a rigorous and standardized performance measurement system that is effective and efficient.
  • Risk management: Anticipate and manage risks and drivers to ensure excellent fund stewardship. 
  • Marketing and communications: Establish the GMF as a catalyst, collaborator and conduit for municipalities and their partners undertaking environmental initiatives.
  • Integrated projects: An integrated projects sector is appropriately incorporated into a new GMF client-centered funding offer.

Note: For more information on the plans and objectives of the GMF for fiscal year 2013–14, refer to the Green Municipal Fund Annual Statement of Plans and Objectives 2013–2014.

Link to recipient’s site: http://gmf.fcm.ca/

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Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC)

Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat, 1.1.4 Wildlife Habitat Conservation and 1.1.4.1 Habitat Conservation Partnerships

Name of recipient: Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC)

Start date: March 2007

End date: Date on which the total funding of $245 million is expended (note that the funding agreement is a grant)

Description:  Funding ($225 million invested in 2007 and an additional $20 million invested in 2013) enables the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) to implement the Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP). The Conservancy works to ensure the long-term protection of biodiversity by working with private landowners to secure ecologically significant lands that have been identified as priorities for conservation. The Conservancy acquires and preserves private land through one of four methods: land purchase, land donations, conservation easements and relinquishment of rights. The goal of the program is to secure 218,000 ha of private land for conservation, to implement stewardship activities on an estimated 30,000 ha of lands secured under the NACP, and to monitor conservation agreements on an estimated 25,000 ha of lands secured under the NACP.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (millions)
Total FundingPrior Years’ FundingPlanned Funding
2014–15
Planned Funding
2015–16
Planned Funding
2016–17
$245.0$225.0 transferred from April 1, 2007, to March 31, 2013, plus $9.8 pending for fiscal year 2013–14$10.2$0.0$0.0

Summary of annual plans of recipient:  The Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP) operates on the basis of the Environment Canada-approved annual NACP work plan. The work plans for the original $225 million have been submitted and approved. New annual work plans will be created for the $20 million investment. These work plans identify (1) priority areas for land acquisition; (2) the number of land transactions (including acreage) anticipated for those priority areas; (3) priority conservation actions (urgent and necessary conservation actions documented within an NCC management-approved property management plan that, without implementation, could result in the reduction of viability of a biodiversity target or the increase in magnitude of a critical threat within the next 5 to 10 years from the date on the approved property management plan) that will take place on lands secured under the NACP; and (4) conservation agreements that will be monitored on lands secured under the NACP, andwith the projection of expenditures for these activities. Required funding is transferred based on the approved work plan.

In terms of performance reporting for the NACP, the NCC submits an annual progress report that highlights the land transactions and other achievements in meeting the NACP’s goals. It is important to note that, as with other land conservation initiatives that use land securement, conservation easements and other means to increase the volume of private land conserved, the NACP’s achievements in this regard are dependent on the landowners’ engagement and willingness to close the deal in a timely fashion.

As per the funding agreement, the total funding for the NCC is $245 million. By the end of 2014–15, it is expected that Environment Canada will have transferred the maximum amount of $245 million.

Link recipient’s site: www.natureconservancy.ca

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Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC)

Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program, Sub-Program and Sub-Sub-Program: 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air, 3.2.3 Environmental Technology and 3.2.3.1 Sustainable Development Technologies

Name of recipient: Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC)

Start dates:  March 2001 – Sustainable Development Technology Fund (SD Tech Fund)
September 2007 – Next Generation Biofuels Fund (NGBF)

End dates: June 2017 – SD Tech Fund
September 2027 – NGBF

Description: SDTC is a not-for-profit foundation created by the Government of Canada, with a series of federal grants that now totals $1.09 billion. As sponsoring departments for the federal government, Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada provide federal oversight of SDTC to ensure that it complies with the two funding agreements and the founding legislation. Natural Resources Canada is the federal SDTC lead.

SDTC manages two separate funds:

  • The SD Tech Fund ($590 million, consisting of $550 million in up-front funding and an additional $40 million announced in Budget 2011) to provide financial support to projects that have the potential to advance sustainable development, including technologies to address climate change, clean air, and water and soil quality issues.
  • The NGBF ($500 million) to provide financial support towards the establishment of facilities producing next-generation renewable fuels at large demonstration scale.

SDTC-funded projects are active in all major Canadian economic sectors, including energy exploration and production, power generation, energy utilization, transportation, agriculture, forestry and wood products, and waste management.

The following table includes the up-front funding by Environment Canada for both the SD Tech Fund and the NGBF.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (millions)
 Total FundingPrior Years’ FundingPlanned Funding
2014–15
Planned Funding
2015–16
Planned Funding
2016–17
SD Tech Fund295.0275.012.53.03.0
NGBFFootnote 1250.0145.7104.30.00.0
Total545.0420.7116.83.03.0

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Funds to the NGBF are also disbursed through a transfer payment (grant) funding mechanism. For more information, please refer to the Details of Transfer Payment Programs for the NGBF table.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Summary of annual plans of recipient: SDTC publishes a corporate plan in November of each year that describes plans for the current year and provides a forecast for the following year for both the SD Tech Fund and the NGBF. It includes a disbursement plan, planned administration expenditures, objectives and proposed actions, an investment update, an operating strategy, and performance expectations.

SD Tech Fund

The SDTC 2014 Corporate Plan outlines nine areas of activities that support one or more of the primary goals of the foundation.  These activities include funding projects, creating market consortia, enabling market entry for technologies, and others.

NextGen Biofuels Fund

The NGBF will focus on progressing approved projects to final investment decisions. Projects currently under due diligence will be advanced through the project assurance process in order to proceed towards applications for funding.

Link to recipient’s site: www.sdtc.ca

Link to Environment Canada’s SDTC page: www.ec.gc.ca/scitech/default.asp?lang=En&n=7C0A752B-1

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Horizontal Initiatives


The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP)

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (followed from the 2-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)).

Name of Lead Department(s)

Environment Canada with support from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

Lead Department Program Activity

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized (EC); Financial Management (TBS).

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

The 2-year FCSAAP program, with $175 million in funding, commenced April 1, 2003. FCSAP was approved in 2005, with funding of $3.5 billion over 15 years.

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

The first phase of the program ended March 31, 2011. FCSAP will continue to March 31, 2020. However, the current policy approval for the second phase ends March 31, 2016.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2016)

$2.737 billion (including PWGSC accommodations charges)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites presenting the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2013, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $4.891 billion (Public Accounts of Canada 2013). Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered by Environment Canada with support from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shared Outcome(s)

Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

Governance Structure(s)

The Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Planning Highlights

Phase II will focus remediation efforts on the highest-priority FCSAP sites (including Giant and Faro Mines in the North). From April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015 remediation activities will be conducted on 117  sites and site assessments will occur on an estimated 34 sites. It is estimated that remediation expenditures in Phase II will reduce liability by up to $1.17 billion for all FCSAP-funded sites.

Federal PartnerFederal Partner ProgramNames of Programs for Federal PartnersTotal Allocation
(Apr 1, 2003 to Mar 31, 2016)
($ thousands)
Planned Spending for
2014–2015(1) ($ thousands)
2014-15
Expected Results
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaResponsible Federal StewardshipContaminated Sites Management Program188,406.4841.4See below.
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaNorthern Land and ResourcesContaminated Sites1,107,927.652,438.5See below.
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development CanadaTotal1,296,334.053,279.9 
Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaInternal ServicesContaminated Sites7,275.6385.0See below.
Canada Border Services AgencyCorporate Management and DirectionInfrastructure and Environment3,490.20NA
Canadian Food Inspection AgencyNANA183.80NA
Correctional Service CanadaInternal ServicesFacilities/Asset Management Services14,145.8135.4See below.
Environment CanadaThreats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimizedAsset Remediation and Disposal57,220.9998.6See below.
Environment CanadaThreats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimizedContaminated Sites74,670.75,500.4See below.
Environment CanadaTotal131,891.66,499.0 
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaInternal ServicesContaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects94,885.01,605.9See below.
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaInternal ServicesFCSAP Expert Support31,121.91,884.4See below.
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaTotal126,006.92,714.6 
Health CanadaFirst Nations and Inuit HealthFirst Nations and Inuit Health Protection7,445.20NA
Health CanadaContaminated SitesHealthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch62,749.13,475.3See below.
Health CanadaTotal70,194.33,475.3 
Industry CanadaCommunications Research Centre CanadaContaminated Site Management Program162.00NA
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges IncorporatedManagement of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal areaNA23,889.746.0N/A
Marine Atlantic Inc.Corporate ManagementFCSAP (Projects)120.00NA
National Capital CommissionReal Asset ManagementLand and real asset management31,829.1120.0See below.
National DefenceEnvironmental Protection and StewardshipContaminated Sites Program576,147.315,600.0See below.
National Research Council of CanadaInternal ServicesEnvironmental Operations5,257.018.0NA
Natural Resources CanadaInternal Services – Real PropertyFCSAP28,858.80NA
Parks Canada AgencyConserve Heritage ResourcesActive Management and Restoration51,551.23,802.2See below.
Public Works and Government Services CanadaFederal Accommodation & HoldingsFCSAP (Projects)109,300.215,483.0See below.
Public Works and Government Services CanadaFederal Accommodation & HoldingsFCSAP (Expert Support)8,850.0650.0See below.
Public Works and Government Services CanadaTotal118,150.216,133.0 
Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceInternal ServicesFCSAP (Projects)25,605.25.0NA
Transport CanadaSustainable Transportation Development and the EnvironmentEnvironmental Programs204,467.116,776.3See below.
Treasury Board of Canada SecretariatFinancial ManagementAssets and Acquired Services5,385.6527.9See below.
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners*Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners
2,720,945.4120,293.2

*Excluding PWGSC accommodations charges.

(1) Reprofile requests could be submitted to TBS later during the year and, pending TB approval of the reprofile requests, certain objectives as established in the RPP could be impacted.

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Expected Results

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

The Northern Land and Resources section will undertake remediation activities on one site.

The Lands and Economic Developments section will undertake to complete the assessment of 10 and the remediation of five sites.

Agriculture and Agri-Food

Assessment activities will occur at three sites, and one site will undergo remediation.

Correctional Service Canada

Assessment activities will occur at five sites, and two sites will undergo remediation.

Environment Canada

Assessment activities will occur at four sites and four sites will undergo remediation.

Contaminated Sites (FCSAP Secretariat): In cooperation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the FCSAP Secretariat supports the Director General and Assistant Deputy Minister steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group; oversees the project selection process; coordinates site funding and reporting processes; manages program communications; and evaluates program performance.

In 2014–2015, the FCSAP Secretariat will lead the planning for renewal of the program in Phase III (2016 to 2020); coordinate, analyze and report the program performance against established targets, and optimize the FCSAP information management system.

Through its role as an expert support department within FCSAP, Environment Canada will conduct the following activities:

  • provide a central point of expert support services for custodial departments;
  • coordinate regional and headquarters activities of other expert support departments (including implementation of interdepartmental regional working groups, integrated work planning, etc.);  
  • coordinate and undertake the review of site classification scores with other expert support departments ;
  • lead the resolution of issues related to project implementation or eligibility;
  • ensure that information on program tools and guidance is disseminated, that lessons learned are shared and that custodians’ needs are addressed;
  • provide technical advice and expert information on ecological risks and environmental matters (e.g. compliance promotion with federal environmental statutes, National Classification System for Contaminated Sites and aquatic sites classification scoring, Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment approaches, waste management, sampling design, emerging chemicals, etc.) at the project level and at the program level via the development of science based  tools, best practices, guidance documents, and environmental quality guidelines; and 
  • provide training on the assessment and management of ecological risks at FCSAP sites as well as key training on other broader program-related aspects (ex. site prioritization, site closure tool).

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Assessment activities will occur at seven sites and 30 sites will undergo remediation.

In 2014–2015, DFO FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat;
  • development of guidance material and provision of training to custodial organizations on the management of FCSAP aquatic sites (e.g. long-term monitoring and site closure of aquatic sites, remediation technologies identified in aquatic site remediation / risk management plans and the Aquatic Sites Framework);
  • review of project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered; and
  • review and evaluation of FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what level, the risk to fish and fish habitat has been reduced as a result of custodial actions.

Health Canada

In 2014–2015, the Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch (Health Canada FCSAP Expert Support) will conduct the following activities:

  • provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and risk management;
  • risk communication;
  • review of National Classification System (NCS) scoring, human health risk assessments and remediation plans for projects;
  •  participation in interdepartmental national and regional working groups; and
  • development of the human health component of Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) soil quality guidelines.

National Capital Commission

Five sites will undergo remediation.

National Defence

Remediation will be completed at two sites while an additional 10 sites will have ongoing remediation, and 12 sites will undergo long-term monitoring.

Parks Canada Agency

Assessment activities will occur at four sites and three sites will undergo remediation.

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)

Assessment activities will occur at one site and 15 sites will undergo remediation.

In 2014–2015, PWGSC FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • develop contaminated site management tools
  • collect and share information about innovative and sustainable/green approaches to contaminated sites management
  • inform the private sector of likely federal demand for services

Transport Canada

Remediation will be completed at 1 site while an additional 23 sites will have ongoing remediation activities, and three sites will undergo long-term monitoring.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

TBS supports Environment Canada in the management of the FCSAP Program through the provision of strategic advice and policy guidance to ensure that ongoing implementation of FCSAP is undertaken in a manner that is consistent with Treasury Board policies on management of federal real property, including federal contaminated sites. In this role, TBS will advise Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress, administer the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory, and coordinate planning for the biennial Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop to be held in April 2014.

Contact information

FCSAP Secretariat
Contaminated Sites Division
17th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St. Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, QC
K1A 0H3
819-934-5194

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The Group on Earth Observations (GEO)

The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is a key international engagement of the Government of Canada that is coordinated through the Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observations.

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada is the lead department in International GEO by virtue of the identification of the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal. Domestically, contributing departments and agencies are Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and Environment Canada (EC).

Lead department PAA program(s): 2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing. Although GEO has a mandate until 2015, this is expected to be extended by the Ministers for another 10-year period until 2025.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Funding is provided through the existing resources envelope (A-Base) and in-kind contributions from federal departments. A contribution agreement was signed in 2013 between Environment Canada and GEO for a 5-year period, committing Canada to a contribution of $100,000 per year through 2018.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The GEO seeks to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision- and policy-makers in all countries. In doing so, users such as Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada will be able to better predict the future state of Planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Enhancing access to Global Earth Observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

Governance structure(s): Coordination is achieved through the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)-level Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observation (FCGEO), the Director General-level Shadow Committee and other ad hoc committees.

Planning highlights:

The interdepartmental ADM-level FCGEO steering committee is co-chaired by AAFC and NRCan. This committee will remain active in ensuring national coordination of Earth Observation issues, providing direction to make linkages with geomatics initiatives and explore the larger issue of data standard and sharing policies and principles.

In the coming years, Canada’s active participation in international GEO will contribute to global efforts in the area of forest carbon tracking, the Global Forest Observation Initiative and the fire danger rating system (Canadian Forest Service and the Canadian Space Agency). Fisheries and Oceans Canada will contribute to the GEO Blue Planet efforts to coordinate the collection and dissemination (with a goal in real-time) of marine observations. Canada (through EC) will also contribute to conserving global biodiversity, through a new leadership role as Vice Chair of the GEO Biodiversity Observation Network Steering Committee.

Canada will continue in a leadership and coordination role for the development and implementation of the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM), including hosting the global secretariat and JECAM coordination website (AAFC) and through contributions of RADARSAT-2 data to research sites (CSA). Canada actively supports G20 GEOGLAM (the GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative), as a member of the core implementation team and co-lead of the Research for Monitoring Enhancements component, through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, which will continue to lead Canada’s engagement. The Canadian Space Agency is also supporting the data acquisition phase until 2015 through the CEOS engagement.

In fiscal year year 2014–15, NRCan’s Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation (CCME) will have several staff working on preparation for access to key new international Earth Observation satellite missions, i.e., Sentinel 1, Sentinel 2, and the Landsat Data Continuity Mission. Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists are involved in the scientific development of the Sentinel-3 and Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) missions.

Through the CSA, Canada will continue to participate in the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) to ensure coordination of satellite missions in support of Canada’s needs for space-based data. This includes in-kind and/or data provision to support Disaster Risk Management, Virtual Constellations, Earth Observation data quality assurance and the response to the GEO Carbon Strategy Report.

Canada will also play a key role in promoting good governance and accountability of GEO, with EC participating in the team conducting the fifth evaluation of GEOSS implementation. Canada plans to be engaged in the plans to develop the next 10-year GEOSS Implementation Plan (post-2015), which will lay out the detailed work plan to achieve GEO’s vision and strategic objectives in the post-2015 era.

Horizontal Initiatives
Federal PartnerPAA ProgramContributing activities/programsTotal Allocation (from start to end date)
($ dollar)
2014–15 Planned Spending
($ dollar)
2014–15 Expected Results
Environment CanadaWeather and Environmental Services for CanadiansMeteorological Service of CanadaN/AIn-kind contributions of $75,000 salary and $50,000 O&M from the existing resources envelope (A‑Base); new contribution of $100,000Please refer to the section below
Natural Resources Canada

Responsible Natural Resource Management

Protections for Canadians and Natural Resources

a. Canadian Forest Service In kind: $34,000Please refer to the section below
Natural Resources Canada

Responsible Natural Resource Management

Protections for Canadians and Natural Resources

b. Earth Sciences Sector/CCME In kind: from existing resource envelopePlease refer to the section below
Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaEnvironmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement.a. Science and Technology In kind: 0.5 FTE ($60,000 salary) and $50,000 O&M from existing resource envelopePlease refer to the section below
Canadian Space AgencySpace Data, Information and Servicesa. Earth Observations 

$25,000 in kind (salaries)

$5,000 O&M (travel)

$287,000 for RADARSAT-2 imagery processing in support of GEO-led initiatives

Please refer to the section below
Fisheries and Oceans CanadaScience for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture to National /
International Missions and Ocean Forecasting
a. Ecosystems and Oceans Science Sector 2.0 FTEs (combined) and approx. $10,000 O&M (travel)Please refer to the section below
TotalNot applicable$100,000
(contribution from Environment Canada)
 

Expected Results by program of federal partners:

Participation in GEO by Canadian departments is expected to have benefits in GEO’s nine areas: ecosystems, biodiversity, agriculture/forestry, energy production, human health, weather forecasting, climate forecasting, disaster risk reduction, and water management. GEO’s coordination of open and full access to all available space-based and in-situ Earth observations is consistent with the Government of Canada’s Open Government Strategy, which commits to open data in order to increase the amount and improve the quality of information available to decision- and policy-makers at all levels of government and in industry, resulting in better predictions, identification of issues and adaptation and mitigation strategies and overall better management of these areas. 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Danielle Lacasse
Director General
Policy, Planning and Partnership Directorate
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
819-934-4571
danielle.lacasse@ec.gc.ca

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Great Lakes Ecosystem Initiative (GLEI)

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

Lead department PAA Program(s): 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2010 (Great Lake Action Plan V resources)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:TB-approved funding ceases at various times--see below. GLEI delivery is ongoing through use of A-Base resources.

Total federal funding allocation (start dates to end dates):

  • Great Lake Action Plan V (GLAPV) resources: $40 million over 5 years, from 2010 to 2015 and then ongoing
  • Clean Water Action Plan (CWAP) resources: $48.9 million over 14 years, from 2007 to 2021
  • Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative (GLNI) resources: $16 million over 4 years, from 2012 to 2016

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The GLEI is the name given to Environment Canada’s activities in support of the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. These activities include negotiation and implementation of the Canada–United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and the Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. Activities are supported by the implementation of the GLAPV, the CWAP sediment work, the GLNI and activities delivered with A-base resources.

The Government of Canada completed negotiations in 2012 with the Government of the United States to amend the GLWQA, which came into force on February 12, 2013. The GLWQA establishes long-term binational goals and objectives for the restoration and protection of Great Lakes water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. The Government of Canada is now completing negotiations for the 2014–19 Canada–Ontario Agreement, which will coordinate domestic actions to help deliver Canada’s obligations in the 2012 GLWQA. 

Great Lakes Action Plan

The Great Lakes Action Plan was renewed in 2010 with a commitment to ongoing funding. An amount of $8 million per year is allocated for Areas of Concern (AOCs) to implement remedial actions to complete the clean-up and restoration in three key areas: fish and wildlife habitat rehabilitation and stewardship; contaminated sediment assessment and remediation; and innovative approaches to improve municipal wastewater effluent quality.

Clean Water Action Plan

Environment Canada’s CWAP includes the Great Lakes sediment remediation initiative. Under this initiative, $48.9 million was allocated over 14 years through 2021 to complete contaminated sediment management projects in 8 specific AOCsWork has been completed in three AOCs: Bay of Quinte, Niagara River and Peninsula Harbour. The remaining funding has been allocated to work in the largest contaminated sediment site in Canada: Randle Reef, the Hamilton Harbour AOC. Funds are administered through the existing federal Great Lakes Sustainability Fund, with one third contributed by each of the federal government, the Province of Ontario and local stakeholders. Potential clean-up measures include the construction of containment structures around and over submerged contaminated sediments; the removal, treatment and disposal of sediment; and natural recovery with long-term monitoring. The remediation of contaminated sediment is an essential prerequisite to the longer-term objective of fully restoring environmental quality in certain Areas of Concern, a key commitment under the Canada–United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).

Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative

In 2012, the Government of Canada committed $16 million over 4 years to the GLNI to address nearshore water quality and aquatic ecosystem health, and toxic and nuisance algae growth in the Great Lakes.

The GLNI will address these issues by determining the current nutrient loadings from selected Canadian tributaries; setting out binational lake ecosystem objectives, phosphorus objectives and load reduction targets; developing policy options and strategies to meet those targets; and developing a nearshore assessment and management framework. The GLNI will also support Canada’s binational commitments under the GLWQA.

Note: Environment Canada is still in the process of finalizing negotiations on the Canada–Ontario Agreement. These negotiations will need to be completed before identifying results by program and by federal and non-federal partners involved in the agreement.

Contact Information:

Jennifer McKay
Manager
Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
Tel.: 416-739-5712

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Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the Next Three Fiscal Years


All upcoming internal audits over the next three fiscal years

This list of internal audits is based on the 2013 Risk-based (3-year) Audit Plan Update dated November 2013. Projects for 2014–15 and 2015–16 are included, while projects for 2016–17 will be updated as the 2014 Audit Plan is developed and approved, which may also have an impact on the projects included below.

Name of Internal AuditInternal Audit TypeStatusExpected Completion Date
Capital Asset Maintenance and RenewalAssuranceIn progressQ1 2014–15
IT Service DeliveryAssuranceIn progressQ1 2014–15
Management of LaboratoriesAssuranceIn progressQ1 2014–15
Fraud Risk Management ReviewAssuranceIn progressQ2 2014–15
Review and Benchmarking of Privacy ProcessesAssuranceIn progressQ2 2014–15
Financial Management FrameworkAssuranceIn progressQ3 2014–15
External Reporting on PerformanceAssuranceIn progressQ2 2014–15
Management and Delivery of ProcurementAssuranceIn progressQ3 2014–15
Information Technology SecurityAssuranceIn progressQ2 2014–15
Integrated Planning / Operational PlanningAssurancePlannedQ1 2015–16
Staffing and ClassificationAssurancePlannedQ1 2015–16
Regulation Development ProcessAssurancePlannedQ2 2015–16
Governance FrameworkAssurancePlannedQ1 2015–16
Emergency Management and PlanningAssurancePlannedQ2 2015–16
Systems, Applications and Products (SAP) ImplementationAssuranceIn progressQ2 2015–16
Management and/or Compliance of International Environmental AgreementsAssurancePlannedQ1 2016–17
Real Property and AccommodationAssurancePlannedQ1 2016–17
Species at RiskAssurancePlannedQ3 2016–17
Expenditure Management FrameworkAssurancePlannedQ2 2016–17
HR Planning and ManagementAssurancePlannedQ2 2016–17
Implementation of GCDocs (records management system)AssurancePlannedQ2 2016–17

Electronic Link to Internal Audit Plan: Risk-Based Audit and Evaluation Plan

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All upcoming evaluations over the next three fiscal years

This list of evaluation projects for 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17 presented below is based on the 2013 Risk-based (5-year) Evaluation Plan Update dated November 2013. As the 2014 Evaluation Plan is developed and approved, the projects included below may change.

Name of Evaluation and Link to ReportProgram ActivityStatusExpected Completion Date
Species at Risk Program1.1.2 Species at RiskPlannedQ4 2016–17
Migratory Birds Program1.1.3 Migratory BirdsPlannedQ2 2016–17
Habitat Conservation Partnerships Program1.1.4.1 Habitat Conservation PartnershipsPlannedQ1 2015–16
Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health Program1.2.1 Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems HealthIn progressQ4 2014–15
Water Resource and Management Use Program1.2.2 Water Resource Management and UseIn progressQ2 2014–15
Sustainability and Reporting Indicators Program1.3.1 Sustainability and Reporting IndicatorsPlannedQ4 2014–15
Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches1.3.2 Ecosystem Assessment and ApproachesPlannedQ4 2015–16
Regulatory Improvements for Major Resource Projects1.3.2 Ecosystem Assessment and ApproachesPlannedQ1 2015–16
Environmental Youth Employment1.3.3.3 Environmental Youth EmploymentIn progressQ4 2014–15
Education and Engagement1.3.3 Community EngagementPlannedQ4 2015–16
Great Lakes Action Plan1.3.4.1 Great LakesPlannedQ4 2014–15
St. Lawrence Ecosystem Initiative1.3.4.2 St. LawrencePlannedQ4 2014–15
Lake Simcoe Ecosystem Initiative1.3.4.3 Lake Simcoe / South-eastern Georgian BayPlannedQ4 2015–16
Lake Winnipeg Ecosystem Initiative1.3.4.4 Lake WinnipegPlannedQ3 2016–17
Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings Program2.1.1 Weather Observations, Forecasts and WarningsPlannedQ1 2015–16
Funding to Support the Government of Canada’s Provision of Essential Federal Services to the Toronto 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games2.1.1 Weather Observations, Forecasts and WarningsPlannedQ2 2015–16
Climate Information, Predictions and Tools Program2.1.3 Climate Information, Predictions and ToolsPlannedQ4 2015–16
Clean Air Adaptation2.1.3 Climate Information, Predictions and ToolsPlannedQ4 2015–16
Meteorological Services in Support of Air Navigation2.2.1 Meteorological Services in Support of Air NavigationPlannedQ4 2016–17
Meteorological Services in Support of Military Operations2.2.3 Meteorological Services in Support of Military OperationsPlannedQ1 2015–16
Meteorological Services for Economic and Commercial Sectors2.2.4 Meteorological Services for Economic and Commercial SectorsIn progressQ3 2014–15
Radarsat Constellation Mission2.1.1 Weather Observations, Forecasts and Warnings Program /
2.2.2 Meteorological and Ice Services in Support of Marine Navigation
PlannedQ4 2016–17
Chemicals Management Plan3.1.1 Substances ManagementPlannedQ2 2015–16
Marine Pollution3.1.3 Marine PollutionPlannedQ3 2015–16
Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA III)3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
2.1.2 Health-related Meteorological Information
In progressQ4 2014–15
Clean Air Transportation3.2.1.2 Transportation Sector EmissionsPlannedQ4 2015–16
International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnerships Program (CAA International)3.2.2 International Climate Change and Clean Air PartnershipsPlannedQ4 2015–16
Genomic Research and Development3.2.3.2 Environmental Technology InnovationPlannedQ4 2015–16
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution Program3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – PollutionPlannedQ4 2016–17

Electronic link to evaluation plan: Risk-Based Audit and Evaluation Plan

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Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects

Description: Randle Reef is an area of highly contaminated sediment located on the south shore of Hamilton Harbour in the western end of Lake Ontario, and is considered to be the largest and one of the more complex and highly contaminated sediment sites in the Great Lakes. With the remediation of the Sydney Tar Ponds nearing completion, Randle Reef is now the largest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediment site in Canada. Sediment remediation is required to reduce the environmental impacts of contaminants, including the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals located at this site.

Owing to the long history of contamination (more than 150 years) from multiple sources, it is not possible to apply the polluter pay principle. Instead, a shared responsibility model has been adopted with the Government of Canada, Government of Ontario and the local community, participating equally in the design and implementation of a solution. This legacy site is a priority for remediation in the Hamilton Harbour Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and under the Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem.

The Randle Reef Sediment Remediation project involves the construction of a 7.5-ha engineered containment facility (ECF) over the most highly contaminated sediment, dredging and placement of additional contaminated sediment within the ECF, and in-situ capping and isolation of remaining targeted sediment – for a grand total of 675,000 m3 of sediment being managed.

Project Stage:The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) Comprehensive Study report was signed by the Minister in May 2013. Project implementation agreements between Environment Canada and each of the project funding organizations were signed in September 2013, following which the Department entered into a specified service agreement with Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) to implement the project as the contracting authority. The PWGSC’s contract tendering process has been initiated towards a construction start in the spring of 2014.

Leading and Participating Departments and Agencies
Lead DepartmentEnvironment Canada
Contracting AuthorityPublic Works and Government Services Canada
Participating Department(s)

Ontario’s Ministry of the Environment

City of Hamilton

City of Burlington

Region of Halton

Hamilton Port Authority

U.S. Steel Canada

Prime and Major Subcontractor(s)
Prime ContractorNot determined yet
Major Subcontractor(s)Not determined yet
Major MilestoneDates (Proposed)
Pre-construction preparations2013–14
Stage 1: ECF Construction2014–15 to 2016–17
Stage 2: Dredging and Containment2016–17 to 2018–19
Stage 3: Capping and Landscaping2019–20 to 2021–22
Post-construction Monitoring/Maintenance2022–23 to 2036–37

Project outcomes: Project outcomes are the measurable results expected at the end of the project and they contribute to the sustainment or improvement of one of the activities in Environment Canada’s Program Alignment Architecture.

The objective of the project is to contribute to the improvement of environmental conditions in Hamilton Harbour and to assist in the delisting of the harbour as an Area of Concern. Performance of the remediation project will be measured with a set of indicator studies designed to assess the effectiveness of the sediment remediation project. Indicator studies have been undertaken for the project to establish baseline biological and chemical conditions in the remediation area, and will be used to assess the effectiveness of the project through a comparison with post-remediation conditions. The studies include

  • PAH concentrations and profiles in suspended sediments
  • Sediment toxicity and benthic invertebrate community structure
  • Incidence of tumours and external abnormalities in wild fish

The Randle Reef Sediment Remediation Project will prevent or reduce the spread of PAH-contaminated sediment from the project site into the rest of the harbour. The remediation of Randle Reef will improve water quality and reduce contaminant levels in biota, eventually making it safer to consume fish caught in the harbour. It will also remove current restrictions on navigation and generate economic returns through the creation of valuable port lands.

Progress report and explanations of variances: The Treasury Board approved the Randle Reef Project on December 13, 2012, with an estimated cost of $138.9 million. The construction phase of the project is scheduled to be completed in 2022, with post-construction monitoring to continue for an additional 15 years to 2037.

Industrial benefits: Hamilton Harbour is a 2,150-ha embayment located at the western end of Lake Ontario and connected to the lake by a single ship canal across the sandbar that forms the bay. The Harbour accommodates a commercial port and is considered a major shipping centre. The south shore of the harbour supports the highest concentration of heavy-metal industries (primarily iron and steel) in Canada.

The contaminated sediment targeted for remediation is located at Randle Reef along the south shore of Hamilton Harbour in the vicinity of piers 14, 15 and 16. The ECF will be connected to Pier 15, owned by the Hamilton Port Authority, located south of the property owned by U.S. Steel (formerly Stelco).

Following project completion, the Hamilton Port Authority (HPA) will develop and operate the surface of the ECF as a marine facility and will be responsible for ongoing monitoring and maintenance. Two thirds of the site may be developed into a marine terminal that will be suitable for ships of Great Lakes Seaway draught, providing access to berths along Pier 15, northwest of Sherman Inlet. The remaining one third of the site will either be maintained as vegetated green space or surfaced with a suitable aggregate material and used as industrial space.

In 2007, a research study by York University revealed that the net benefits (environmental, social and economic) of cleaning up Randle Reef were estimated as $126 million over 25 years. The proposed Randle Reef Contaminated Sediment Remediation Project will further advance the economic competitiveness of the region through expanded port facilities, shoreline redevelopment and the creation of approximately 60 jobs a year over the 8-year life of the project.

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Greening Government Operations

Goal 6: GHG Emissions and Energy

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Departmental target: 17% below 2005 by 2020

Scope and Context

Targeted GHG emissions sources include facilities and fleet. Environment Canada monitors and reports annually, on GHG emissions from its entire fleet inventory and 15 of its custodial facilities, representing 93% of its floor space. Fleet emissions have dropped 25% below 2005-06 levels, so focus has shifted to reduced facility emissions. Site-specific, SMART targets have been set, focusing on the implementation of reduction opportunities in six categories. These categories are comprised of; operational improvements, maintenance procedures, occupant engagement, life cycle management, energy performance contracting, and other best practices.

Link to department's PAA

Program : 4.1.3 Asset Management Services

Financial Performance Expectations (optional)

 

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2015Yes [March 31, 2015]
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005-200622.6 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in current fiscal year21.6 kt
Renewable power emission credits applied in current fiscal year (kt CO2 equivalent)0 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the current fiscal year, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable-4.6 %
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions (indicate if not applicable)Not Applicable

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

7.1 Target: Real Property Environmental Performance

As of April 1 2014, and pursuant to departmental Real Property Sustainability Frameworks, an industry recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Scope and Context (optional)

 

Link to department's PAA

Sub-Sub-Program: 4.1.3.1 Real Property

Financial Performance Expectations (optional)

 

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

An industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Real Property Sustainability Framework in place to improve the management of energy, waste and water in departmental real property assets by March 31, 2015.Yes [March 31, 2015]
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings (over 1000 m2) and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1000 m2) where the Crown is the major lessee,  assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool, and associated floor space (m2)

16 Crown-owned buildings
103,937 m2


0 New lease or lease renewal projects
0 m2


Planned assessment tool to be used: BOMA BESt (Building Owners and Managers Association, Building Environmental Standards)

Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings, new construction, build-to-lease projects, major renovations projects,  achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance, and associated floor space (m2)

0 Crown-owned buildings
0 m2


1 New construction projects
448 m2


0 Build-to-lease projects
0 m2


0 Major renovation projects
0 m2


Planned environmental performance level to be achieved: 3 Green Globes, LEED Silver or equivalent

Number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance

0 Fit-up and refit projects
0 m2


Planned environmental performance level to be achieved: 3 Green Globes, LEED Silver or equivalent

Implementation Strategy Element or Best PracticePerformance Target
7.1.1.1. Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian’s current commitment(s) to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tool(s). [Mandatory]Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.3. Develop plans to address environmental performance assessment recommendations for existing Crown-owned buildings.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.4. Manage the collection, diversion and disposal of workplace waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.5. Manage construction, renovation and demolition waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.6. Develop an approach to improve performance of Crown-owned buildings via automation and commissioning.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.7. Develop an approach to building operator training in Crown-owned buildings.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.8. Integrate the use of sustainable real property performance management indicators into the investment decision-making process for Crown-owned assets in the building portfolio (e.g. density, energy intensity, facility condition etc.).Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.1.1.9. Benchmark and report annually on the energy usage intensity of Crown-owned office buildings using an industry recognized tool.Seeking to reach “achieved”

Best Practice

7.1.2. Real property managers and functional heads responsible for new construction, leases or existing building operations will have clauses related to environmental considerations incorporated into their performance evaluations.

Seeking to reach “Achieved”

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context (optional)

 

Link to department's PAA

4.1.3.3 Acquisition

Financial Performance Expectations (optional)

 

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place.Yes [March 31, 2015]
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year (2014-15).21 of 26
80%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement, in the given fiscal year.4 of 4
100%

Recycled Paper Utilization

Departmental Green Procurement Target

By March 31, 2017, 90% of copy paper will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Percentage of copy paper purchases that contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and have forest certification of EcoLogoM or equivalent.90% [March 31, 2015]

Adoption of Scanned Contract Products

Departmental Green Procurement Target

By March 31, 2017, 70% of office furniture purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the furniture.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Dollar value or volume of purchases that meet the objective relative to total expenditures on all office furniture.50% of contracts  (by volume) meet this standard [March 31, 2015]

Adoption of Renewed Procure-to-Pay Processes

Departmental Green Procurement Target

As of April 1, 2015, 90% of new contracts that include janitorial services will include the use of janitorial products, equipment and processes that minimize the environmental impact.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Number of new contracts awarded that include terms related to minimizing environmental impact, relative to the total number of contracts for janitorial services.90% [March31, 2015]
Implementation Strategy Element or Best PracticePerformance Target
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
Seeking to reach “Achieved”
Best Practice
7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.
Seeking to reach “Achieved”
Additional ActivitiesPerformance Target
  

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Scope and Context (optional)

 

Link to department's PAA

Program or sub-Program [No.]: [Title]

Financial Performance Expectations (optional)

 

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by March 31, 2015.Yes [March 31, 2015]
Implementation Strategy Element or Best PracticePerformance Target
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e. printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.4. Minimize the ratio of information technology (IT) assets per employee.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.8. Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings and space utilization in special purpose buildings.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
Additional ActivitiesPerformance Target
  

Goal 8: Water Management

Target 8.1: Water Management

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Scope and Context (optional)

 

Link to department's PAA (optional)

Program or sub-Program [No.]: [Title]

Financial Performance Expectations (optional)

 

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Water is managed sustainably in Government of Canada real property operations.

Performance IndicatorPerformance Target
Approach to improving water management included in Real Property Sustainability Framework by March 31, 2015.Yes [March 31, 2015]
Amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that includes water metering, in the given fiscal year (where feasible).

0 m2 / 0 % Crown, existing


0 m2 / 0 % New Crown, built-to-lease


0 m2 / 0 % Major renovations


0 m2 / 0 % Leases

Implementation Strategy Element or Best PracticePerformance Target
8.1.1.1. Conserve potable water.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
8.1.1.2. Manage storm water run-off.Seeking to reach “Achieved”
8.1.1.3. Improve the metering of water utility usage for existing Crown- owned buildings.Seeking to reach “Achieved”

Best Practice

8.1.2 Conduct potable water audits in Crown-owned assets.

Seeking to reach “Achieved”

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