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2013-2014 Report on Plans and Priorities

Section I: Overview


Environment Canada’s mandate is to provide a clean, safe and sustainable environment for Canadians. It works in partnership with others to fulfill this mandate through a variety of activities, including conducting research on water and air quality, monitoring Canada’s natural environment, developing regulations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, maintaining biodiversity, increasing the number of protected areas within Canada, and providing advance warning for severe weather events.

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Raison d’être

Environment Canada is the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental issues facing Canadians. The Department also plays a stewardship role in achieving and maintaining a clean, safe and sustainable environment. A science-based department, Environment Canada addresses issues through monitoring, research, policy development, service delivery to Canadians, regulations, enforcement of environmental laws, advancement of clean technologies and strategic partnerships. The Department’s programs focus on a clean environment by minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; a safe environment by equipping Canadians to make informed decisions on weather, water and climate conditions; anda sustainable environment by conserving and restoring Canada’s natural environment. The Department’s program focus reflects the interdependence between environmental sustainability and economic well-being.

Responsibilities

Did you know?

A long history
Environment Canada was created in 1971, but some of its component organizations are much older, such as the Canadian Wildlife Service founded in 1947 and the Meteorological Service of Canada in 1871.

A national workforce
Approximately two thirds of Environment Canada’s employees work outside the National Capital Region. Department employees are located across Canada, from Iqaluit to Burlington and from Vancouver to St. John’s, working in field offices and laboratories, national wildlife areas, and weather stations.

A number of acts and regulations provide the Department with its mandate and allow it to carry out its programs. Under the Department of the Environment Act, the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of the Environment extend to and include matters relating to

  • the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment, including water, air and soil quality;
  • renewable resources, including migratory birds and other non-domestic flora and fauna;
  • water;
  • meteorology;
  • the enforcement of any rules or regulations made by the International Joint Commission relating to boundary waters; and
  • coordination of the policies and programs of the Government of Canada respecting the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment.

Beyond those authorities conferred under the Department of the Environment Act, the Minister of the Environment exercises additional authorities provided under other acts and regulations including (but not limited to) the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999),the Federal Sustainable Development Act, and several pieces of legislation relating to the protection of biodiversity and water and the enforcement of environmental laws and regulations. Under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012), Environment Canada provides information and analysis to inform the environmental assessment process.

The Department is a key partner for other federal departments (including its ministerial portfolio partners, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the Parks Canada Agency), where statutes provide Environment Canada with secondary or shared responsibility for the successful execution of other federal departments’ mandates. These statutes include, among others, the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act (Transport Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Resources Canada), the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology Act (Natural Resources Canada), the Fisheries Act (Fisheries and Oceans Canada), the Species at Risk Act (Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Parks Canada Agency), and the Marine Liability Act (Transport Canada).

Bringing together science, regulation and partnerships for the benefit of Canadians

The Department supports its stewardship mandate through an array of diverse programs based on science, technology and strong partnerships. Environment Canada is also the federal government’s most active regulator.

  • Environment Canada works for the benefit of Canadians. The Department serves Canadians by providing weather and environmental services, and, with its partners, by protecting fragile ecosystems, promoting compliance with environmental regulations, managing risks to human health and the environment from chemicals, and cleaning up waters such as those shared by Canada and the United States to support health, recreation and economic goals.
  • Environment Canada is a science-based department. The Department devotes significant resources to activities in diverse fields, including biology, chemistry, atmospheric and environmental sciences, hydrology, meteorology, engineering, and informatics. These activities are central to the Department’s capacity to support sound environmental decision making.
  • Environment Canada is an active regulator. Innovation in science and technology supports the Department in its role as one of the federal government’s most active regulators. In this capacity, Environment Canada strives to be a world-class regulator in developing, promoting compliance with, and enforcing a wide array of regulations to protect Canadians and their environment.
  • Environment Canada works collaboratively with the provinces and territories and other partners. Environmental issues have wide-ranging implications for social and economic decisions; this calls for extensive collaboration across jurisdictions and sectors. Environment Canada supports broader federal government efforts to improve the environmentally responsible development of Canada’s natural resources through initiatives to reduce air pollution and enhance conservation of biodiversity and habitats. The Department collaborates extensively with provincial/territorial governments, Aboriginal governments,environmental non-governmental organizations, the government of the United States and of other nations, and international organizations.

Weather Services provide direct and daily services to Canadians

Environment Canada provides 24/7 weather and environmental services based on sound science and technology; these services contribute to the health, safety and economic resiliency of Canadians–for instance the Air Quality Health Index that supports Canadians in adapting on a daily basis to air quality levels.

Working together to monitor the oil sands

Monitoring of water, air and biodiversity in the oil sands involves close collaboration between Environment Canada and the government of Alberta–which together lead the monitoring process–and making results easily accessible to Canadians. Industry takes the lead in funding the monitoring and reporting activities that support this major economic initiative.

Environment Canada is developing a Web portal to provide access to information related to the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands. The portal provides maps and details on monitoring activities, together with data collected, analyzed and interpreted by Environment Canada scientists. By ensuring that the oil sands environmental data and information produced are transparent and freely accessible, this Web portal will support the ongoing production of rigorous, comprehensive and scientifically credible information.

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Environment Canada’s Five Key Environmental Indicators

Five key environmental indicators were developed to represent, at a high level, progress in delivering a clean, safe and sustainable environment for Canadians:

Stewardship Mandate: CLEAN – Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

  • KEY INDICATOR 1. Air Quality
    Ambient Concentrations of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)
    Target: 30 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3) annually
  • KEY INDICATOR 2. Climate Change
    GHG Emissions
    Copenhagen target: 17% below 2005 level by 2020

Stewardship Mandate: SAFE – Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

  • KEY INDICATOR 3. Severe Weather Events
    Weather Warning Indicator[1]
    Target: 7.6 on a scale of 0 to 10 by 2015

Stewardship Mandate: SUSTAINABLE – Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

  • KEY INDICATOR 4. Biodiversity
    Protected Areas
    Target: 17% of Canada’s land area by 2020[2]
  • KEY INDICATOR 5. Water Quality
    National Freshwater Quality Indicator*
    Target: 50% of core national monitoring sites in the 2010–2012 data set are rated as good or excellent

*based on the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) water quality ratings

The Department develops and communicates these and other national environmental indicators through the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program. More information is available at the CESI website.

The five indicators are also reported in Environment Canada’s Strategic Outcomes and in the Programs through which the Department fulfills its mandate–as outlined below.

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Strategic Outcomes (SO) and Program Alignment Architecture

Environment Canada fulfills its mandate by promoting three Strategic Outcomes, each contributing to the Government of Canada outcome of a clean and healthy environment.

SO 1 Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations. This Strategic Outcome is aimed at ensuring that land, water and biodiversity are sustained so that Canadians can enjoy and benefit from their natural legacy over the long term.

SO 2 Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions. Canadians need to have the information and services to be able to respond and adapt to immediate and longer-term changes in weather, water and climate conditions that affect their health, safety and economic well-being.

SO 3 Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized. This Strategic Outcome reflects the need for Environment Canada to manage substances and waste, and to reduce pollution that directly or indirectly harms human health or the environment.

2013-2014 Environment Canada Program Alignment Architecture

Government of Canada Priority: Clean and Healthy Environment (text version)

All of the Department's Strategic Outcomes, Program Activities and Internal Services Activities
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Priorities

Environment Canada maintains three environmental priorities and one management priority for 2013–2014. The three environmental priorities are unchanged from the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP):

  • A Clean Environment – Manage substances and waste, and reduce pollution that directly or indirectly harms human health or the environment.
  • A Safe Environment – Provide Canadians with high-quality information on immediate and long-term environmental conditions.
  • A Sustainable Environment – Ensure that land, water and biodiversity are sustained.

These priorities continue to reflect the Department’s stewardship mandate which, in turn, directly supports the Government of Canada’s outcome of a clean and healthy environment. The Department will pursue a number of plans as set out in the following tables–plans that build on the progress made to date on these priorities.

The Department’s management priority for 2013-2014 is:

  • Management Priority – Ensuring that activities and resources are aligned to support delivery of programs, services, and results to Canadians.

The intent of the Department’s management priority remains largely the same as in 2012–2013 but has been restated to reflect a focus on greater alignment of resources to maximize efficiencies and to deliver programs, services and results. This priority is supported by plans set out in the last of the tables below.


Priority 1: A Clean Environment – Manage substances and waste, and reduce pollution that directly or indirectly harms human health or the environment.

Type: ongoing

Links to Strategic Outcome 3:

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Links to Programs:

3.1 Substances and Waste Management

3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air

3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution

Why this is a priority

Harmful substances released into the environment and products that contain toxic substances threaten the health of Canadians and their environment. The application of sound science and clean technologies, as well as a strong regulatory framework, are vital to addressing these threats effectively. Domestic and international activities that affect the environment in Canada call for focused collaboration to make meaningful and lasting progress on achieving a clean environment.

Plan for meeting the priority

The following actions will be undertaken to meet the Department’s Clean Environment priority:


Priority 2: A Safe Environment – Provide Canadians with high-quality information on immediate and long-term environmental conditions.

Type: ongoing

Links to Strategic Outcome 2:

Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Links to Programs:

2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

2.2 Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users

Why this is a priority

Canadians rely on Environment Canada’s weather and environmental services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. This information, including current weather forecasts and warnings and air quality information, helps Canadians make safe decisions in response to changing weather, water and climate conditions. Targeted users (for example, energy and resource development sectors) rely on information specific to their safety and/or economic needs in order to reduce their vulnerability to climate change and variability. Current and reliable science-based information supports users in taking precautions and/or avoiding hazardous areas in order to prevent or limit danger and damage. Ongoing research and development enable Environment Canada to increase the timeliness and accuracy of its weather and environmental prediction.

Plan for meeting the priority

The following actions will be undertaken to meet the Department’s Safe Environment priority:


Priority 3: A Sustainable Environment – Ensure that land, water and biodiversity are sustained.

Type: ongoing

Links to Strategic Outcome 1:

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Links to Programs:

1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

1.2 Water Resources

1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife

Why this is a priority

Canada’s natural environment provides significant economic and other benefits to Canadians. Sustaining these benefits depends on maintaining the diversity of species and sustainable ecosystems. Management of Canada’s freshwater and ocean resources is vital, as these represent both recreational and economic assets. Environment Canada’s monitoring plays an important role in helping to sustain these resources; this work is dependent on the Department’s robust science base, as well as on its promotion of compliance and enforcement through a strong regulatory foundation.

Plan for meeting the priority

The following actions will be undertaken to meet the Department’s Sustainable Environment priority:


Priority 4: Management Priority – Ensuring that activities and resources are aligned to support delivery of programs, services and results to Canadians.

Type: ongoing (restated)

Links to all Strategic Outcomes:

1, 2 and 3

Links to: All Programs

Why this is a priority

Environment Canada must continue to align human and financial resources to where they can best support core services and maintain service levels. This work provides a foundation that supports all departmental activities and ensures that Environment Canada can continue to contribute to the Government of Canada’s plan to return to fiscal balance.

Plan for meeting the priority

The following actions will be undertaken to meet the Department’s Responsive Management priority:

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Risk Analysis

Environment Canada proactively manages potential risks that its programs may face. Through ongoing monitoring, adjustments are made to departmental resources or program objectives to undertake necessary mitigation measures, should these risks materialize. Within the current operating environment, the Department has identified the following three priority areas of risk for 2013–2014:

Engagement: With the environment remaining important to many Canadians, there are high expectations for Environment Canada’s ongoing engagement with its domestic and international partners and stakeholders to help conserve and protect the environment, at the same time as the Department continues to contribute to the government’s plan to return to fiscal balance. Environment Canada will continue to foster key partner and stakeholder relationships with other jurisdictions, Aboriginal peoples and groups, and industry, among others, to build on and share expertise. The Department will continue to access and implement innovative and cost-effective ways, including through technology, to engage international partners and expand stakeholder opportunities to participate in consultations. This work will be undertaken in parallel with improvements to how the Department manages grants and contributions as tools for engagement.

Business Continuity: Environment Canada provides critical weather and other environmental information to Canadians and to a host of stakeholders and partners–both domestically and internationally–24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To counter the risk that this key service could be interrupted, the Department will maintain its evergreen Business Continuity Plan, negotiate service-level agreements with stakeholders and partners, and continue to develop professional staff to maintain these essential services. The Department will also maintain the capacity to respond to hazards and other environmental emergencies, such as extreme weather and climate events. Safeguarding key systems and data is essential to maintaining Environment Canada’s ability to provide the critical services that support the health and safety of Canadians in a timely, coordinated and effective manner. The Department will develop enhanced business arrangements with Shared Services Canada to support the provision of critical weather services.

Skills: The Department’s core services are based on a sound foundation of science, technology and regulatory work. The recruitment, development and retention of employees with the essential and specific skills and knowledge required to support programs and internal services could continue to pose challenges, particularly in the current fiscal environment. Environment Canada will proactively provide a healthy and flexible work environment and otherwise support its workforce so that essential skills, knowledge and experience are maintained and developed through cost-effective means, including by leveraging workforce development opportunities through partnerships. The Department will also engage in ongoing strategic operational planning to address and maintain key competencies and expertise in the fields of meteorology, science and technology, and to maintain operational effectiveness of the services offered both now and into the future in all areas of the Department.

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Planning Summary

Financial Resources ($ millions)*
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending**
2013–2014
Planned Spending**
2014–2015
Planned Spending**
2015–2016
959.4951.6991.1846.0

*All figures are net of respendable revenues. Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
**Planned spending includes amount for the Single Window Initiative and Lake Simcoe. It has also been reduced to reflect a transfer of responsibilities and funds to Shared Services Canada.

The Department’s planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the departmental Strategic Outcomes and Programs. The majority of the increase in 2014–2015 is explained by the increased funding to the Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) foundation, offset by the savings measures announced in Budget 2012. The 2015–2016 planned spending decrease is mainly due to the sunsetting of the temporary portion of funds for initiatives such as the Species at Risk program, meteorological and navigational warning services for the Arctic Ocean, and the Major Projects Management Office. Any funding extensions for temporary funding programs that are expiring in the current or in future fiscal years will be subject to government decision and will be reflected in future Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent–FTE)*
2013–20142014–20152015–2016
6,5186,3496,221

**Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures. The FTE numbers include students.

The human resources required to sustain an average level of employment over 12 months are based on a 37.5-hour work week. One FTE equals one person working full-time on a 37.5-hour work week for the year, or any number of part-time employees whose combined hours of work equal one FTE. An average salary was used to calculate FTEs based on the salary planned spending for the 2013–2014, 2014–2015 and 2015–2016 fiscal years. As a result, Environment Canada plans to use 6,518 FTEs in 2013–2014, with decreases of FTE utilization in 2014–2015 and 2015–2016.

Planning Summary Table ($ millions)*

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.
ProgramActual Spending
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012
Forecast Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat129.8139.4126.6100.697.584.6A Clean and Healthy Environment
Water Resources135.6124.1122.3115.6118.0118.1A Clean and Healthy Environment
Sustainable Ecosystems66.266.668.271.975.968.5A Clean and Healthy Environment
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife16.917.517.616.916.516.2A Clean and Healthy Environment
Subtotal348.5347.6334.7304.9307.9287.4A Clean and Healthy Environment
Less: Respendable Revenues18.517.520.819.920.020.5A Clean and Healthy Environment
Total Planned Spending330.0330.1314.0285.0287.9267.0A Clean and Healthy Environment

The variance between forecast spending for 2012–2013 and planned spending for 2013–2014 is mainly due to the reduction of payment to the Nature Conservancy of Canada. With regard to the decrease from 2014–2015 to 2015–2016, the variance is primarily due to the sunsetting of additional funds provided in Budget 2012 for the Species at Risk Act program.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.
ProgramActual Spending
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012
Forecast Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians190.9175.0181.8156.1161.5162.3A Clean and Healthy Environment
Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users58.859.476.564.965.260.2A Clean and Healthy Environment
Subtotal249.7234.4258.3221.0226.7222.5A Clean and Healthy Environment
Less: Respendable Revenues39.837.943.841.942.141.6A Clean and Healthy Environment
Total Planned Spending209.9196.5214.5179.1184.6180.8A Clean and Healthy Environment

The variance between forecast spending for 2012–2013 and planned spending for 2013–2014 is mainly due to the transfer of responsibilities and funds to Shared Services Canada and the conclusion of the three-year commitment to provide fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord.

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
ProgramActual Spending
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012
Forecast Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Substances and Waste Management106.085.387.776.770.569.5A Clean and Healthy Environment
Climate Change and Clean Air162.3119.2232.1180.3230.6115.9A Clean and Healthy Environment
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution40.043.346.844.142.442.3A Clean and Healthy Environment
Subtotal308.2247.8366.6301.1343.5227.7A Clean and Healthy Environment
Less: Respendable Revenues3.73.03.13.12.82.8A Clean and Healthy Environment
Total Planned Spending304.5244.8363.6298.1340.7224.9A Clean and Healthy Environment

The decrease in planned spending for 2013–2014 as compared to forecast spending for 2012–2013 is mainly due to factors such as the sunsetting of Canada’s Fast Start Financing, and the savings measures as announced in Budget 2012. Variances for 2013-2014 planned spending are mainly due to the increased funding requirements for the Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) Foundation, offset by the additional savings measures announced in Budget 2012. Variances for 2015-2016 are due to reductions in funding for the SDTC Foundation.

Internal Services
ProgramActual Spending
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012
Forecast Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Internal Services242.9237.2195.8190.1178.6173.9N/A
Subtotal242.9237.2195.8190.1178.6173.9N/A
Less: Respendable Revenues0.20.10.20.70.70.7N/A
Total Planned Spending242.7237.1195.5189.4177.9173.3N/A

The variance between actual spending for 2011–2012 and forecast spending for 2012–2013 is explained by the transfer of responsibilities and funds to Shared Services Canada.

Planning Summary Total ($ millions)*
 Actual Spending
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012
Forecast Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
**Please note that this figure excludes $1.8 million actual spending in 2010–2011 incurred under the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). Responsibility for the MGP and the Federal Public Administration MGP Office was transferred to the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development in February 2011.
Strategic Outcomes Programs, and Internal Services1,087.1**1,008.51,087.6951.6991.1846.0

Expenditure Profile

For fiscal year 2013–2014, Environment Canada plans to spend $951.6 million to meet the expected results of its Programs and contribute to its Strategic Outcomes. The chart below reflects the allocation of Environment Canada’s planned spending by Strategic Outcome for 2013–2014. 

Chart showing planned spending by strategic outcome for 2013-2014

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The following graph illustrates Environment Canada’s spending trend from 2009–2010 to 2015–2016.

Graph showing Environment Canada's spending trend from 2009-2010 to 2015-2016

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Note: These figures are net of respendable revenues. Forecast spending includes 2012–2013 Main Estimates plus 2012–2013 Supplementary Estimates A, B and anticipated C, as well as collective agreements. The decline in the spending trend will return the Department to the budget and staffing levels that it had in 2006–2007 by the end of 2015–2016.

For the period between 2009–2010 and 2011–2012, actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For fiscal year 2012–2013, the forecast spending represents the planned budgetary and statutory expenditures as presented in the Estimates documents (Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates). For the period between 2013–2014 and 2015–2016, the planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the departmental Strategic Outcomes.

As seen in the chart above, in 2010–2011 Environment Canada’s spending level was $1.089 billion, a decrease of $6.2 million (0.6%) since 2009–2010. In addition, Environment Canada’s actual spending for 2011–2012 was $1.008 billion, a decrease of $80.4 million (7.4%) from 2010–2011 actual spending. This decrease is mainly due to the responsibilities transferred to Shared Services Canada, and the sunsetting of both the National Vehicle Scrappage Program and Canada’s Economic Action Plan.

Between 2011–2012 and 2012–2013, the graph shows an upward trend due to increases in forecast spending for:

  • Canada’s fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord;
  • Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC); and
  • the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative.

These increases are partly offset by responsibilities transferred to Shared Services Canada and reductions attributable to savings measures announced in Budget 2012.

The net decrease between 2012–2013 forecast spending and 2013–2014 planned spending is mainly due to:

  • the sunsetting of the Canada’s fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord;
  • additional savings measures as announced in Budget 2012;
  • decreased planned spending to foundations (such as the Nature Conservancy of Canada); and
  • reduced funding received from Treasury Board with regard to in-year adjustments and transfers.

For the explanation on variances in planned spending between 2013–2014 and 2015–2016, please see the analysis included in the Planning Summary section.

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Estimates by Vote

For information on the organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–2014 Main Estimates publications.

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Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. The Government will be consulting the public in 2013–2014 regarding the second three-year cycle of the FSDS (2013–2016). The 2013–2016 FSDS will be finalized in 2013–2014. It will be presented as part of year-end performance reporting for 2013–2014.

Environment Canada ensures that consideration of the FSDS outcomes is integral to its decision-making processes. In particular, through the federal Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process, any new policy, plan or program initiative includes an analysis of its impact on attaining the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced, demonstrating the Department’s commitment to achieving FSDS goals and targets.

The Department’s contributions to the FSDS themes are denoted in this document by four visual identifiers:

Theme 1: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityTheme 2: Maintaining Water Quality and AvailabilityTheme 3: Protecting NatureTheme 4: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint Beginning with Government

These contributions are components of the Department’s three Strategic Outcomes. For details on Environment Canada’s activities to support sustainable development, please see Section II of this RPP and Environment Canada’s website. For complete details on the FSDS, please see the FSDS website.



[1] This indicator is calculated based on information from six warning types that are representative of Canada’s climate (severe thunderstorm, rainfall, freezing rain, wind, snowfall and marine gale). For each warning type, the accuracy in predicting the severe weather event and its timeliness is assessed in comparison with the lead times identified in Environment Canada's warning performance target. The target index is on a scale of 0 to 10, where 10 signifies that all warnings were within target lead times and there were no missed events or false alarms.

[2] The parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity set an aspirational target in October 2010, which was to set aside 17% of terrestrial areas and inland waters and at least 10% of marine areas, by 2020. Canada, as a signatory to the Convention, is contributing to this global target. A specific domestic target for Canada is being developed through consultation with provinces, territories and stakeholders, in recognition of this being a Canada-wide rather than federal government target.


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