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Section 1: Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013–16 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). The purpose of the FSDA is to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a federal sustainable development strategy that will make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament. Environment Canada supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this departmental strategy.

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Section 2: Sustainable Development Management System


Environment Canada’s Sustainable Development Vision

Environment Canada’s sustainable development vision is to improve Canadians’ standard of living by protecting human health, conserving the environment, using resources efficiently, and advancing long-term economic competitiveness.

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Departmental Sustainable Development Practices

The concept of sustainable development rests at the core of the Department’s mandate and is an intrinsic part of the planning, decision making and execution of the programming and initiatives for which the Department is responsible. Flexible yet robust processes are, therefore, essential for the Department when considering the social, economic and environmental dimensions of strategy, policy and program issues as these arise. To this end, the Department’s planning and decision-making processes, as part of an established corporate governance structure, allow both formal and informal opportunities for considering issues, setting priorities and rendering decisions or making recommendations as necessary.

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Sustainable Development Champion

The Assistant Deputy Minister of Environment Canada’s Strategic Policy Branch and Regional Directors General Offices is the Sustainable Development Champion, providing overall leadership for the departmental responsibilities related to sustainable development. In 2014–15, the Champion is expected to

  • coordinate the implementation of the 2013–16 FSDS and its Management Framework;
  • provide overall leadership and coordination in the implementation of the FSDA, through effective interdepartmental engagement; and
  • provide leadership for the Department on strategic environmental assessments.

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Intergovernmental Collaboration and Stakeholder Consultation

Environment Canada's sustainable development decisions and actions require collaboration, partnership and information exchanges with key partners and stakeholders, including other levels of government, Aboriginal peoples, industry, environmental non-governmental organizations, and Canadian citizens. As such, Environment Canada aims to foster positive, long-term relationships with these key constituencies in all of its activities. For example, relationships with provincial and territorial partners are advanced through bilateral agreements, as well as through multilateral participation in the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment and the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Working Group on International Climate Change. In addition, the Department consults and engages with Aboriginal peoples and stakeholders to deliver on core priorities such as protecting and conserving our air, water, wildlife and natural areas.

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Decision-making Tools

Regulatory Impact Analysis Statements

Environment Canada uses regulatory impact analysis statements (RIASs) to summarize the expected impacts of the regulatory initiatives that address each of the requirements of the federal government’s regulatory policy, namely the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management.The use of regulatory impact analyses has long been recognized as an international best practice, and RIASs have been used in Canada for over 20 years.

A RIASprovides a non-technical synthesis of information that allows the various audiences to understand the environmental issue being regulated, as well as the federal government’s objectives, and the costs and benefits of the regulation. A RIAS also indicates who will be affected, who was consulted in developing the regulation, and how the federal government will evaluate and measure the performance of the regulation against its stated objectives. The RIAS, in effect, enables the government to explain to the public the need for each regulation.

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Strategic Environmental Assessments

See Section 3, Strategic Environment Assessments.

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Environmental Indicators

Environment Canada provides the regular indicator updates (data and information) used to measure the progress of the FSDS, and Canada’s performance on key environmental sustainability issues. The environmental indicators are based on objective and comprehensive information and convey environmental trends in a straightforward and transparent manner.

The indicators are prepared by Environment Canada with the support of other federal government departments, such as Health Canada, Statistics Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, as well as provincial and territorial government departments. Designed to be relevant to the government policy, the indicators are built on rigorous methodology and high-quality data that are regularly available from surveys and monitoring networks.

National, regional, local and international trends are readily accessible to all Canadians on the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) website which includes graphics, explanatory text, interactive maps and downloadable data. Indicator results are linked to their key social and economic drivers, and information is provided on how the issues are influenced by consumers, businesses and governments. Each indicator is accompanied by a technical explanation of its calculation.

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Ongoing Monitoring and Reporting

Implementation of the DSDS will be monitored and reported on an ongoing basis in two ways:

  • periodic reporting to the Executive Management Committee;Footnote 1and
  • reporting in the departmental reports on plans and priorities and departmental performance reports.

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Audit and Evaluation

The Department’s activities in support of the FSDSFootnote 2 will be evaluated as part of Environment Canada’s Sustainability and Reporting Indicators Program, scheduled for evaluation in 2014–15. The evaluation will address issues related to relevance and performance, in compliance with the Treasury Board’s Policy on Evaluation (2009).

An internal audit of Environment Canada’s contribution to the FSDSwill be considered in the context of the Department’s annual risk-based audit plan required by the Treasury Board’s Policy on Internal Audit. The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development is also required to conduct a review periodically of the FSDS. In addition, the Audit and Evaluation Branch regularly monitors and reports on the status of management commitments made in response to previous audit and evaluation recommendations. Doing so provides Environment Canada’s senior management with timely information on how well the Department is addressing issues or opportunities raised in previous audits and evaluations, including any that would pertain to the FSDS.

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Footnotes

Footnote 1

The EMC(chaired by the Deputy and/or Associate Deputy Minister) is the collective senior executive body of the Department that promotes approval, through consensus building, on issues put before it.

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Footnote 2

Specifically, the evaluation will include both the secretariat function, which Environment Canada holds, as well as Environment Canada-specific elements within the FSDS.

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Section 3. Strategic Environmental Assessments

To ensure that environmental considerations receive an appropriate level of attention in decision making, the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals (the Cabinet Directive) directs all government departments and agencies regarding their obligations in conducting strategic environmental assessments (SEA). As set out in the Cabinet Directive, ministers expect that a SEA will be conducted for policy, plan or program proposals when the following two conditions are met:

  • the policy, plan or program proposal is submitted to Cabinet or to an individual minister for approval; and
  • the implementation of the proposal may result in important environmental effects, either positive or negative.

The Cabinet Directive requires the consideration of the scope and nature of any likely positive or negative environmental impacts generated by these proposals, as well as the need for mitigation to reduce or eliminate adverse effects, and the likely importance of any adverse environmental effects, taking mitigation into account. The Guidelines for Implementing the Cabinet Directive require that departments and agencies consider FSDS goals and targets when undertaking SEAs.

Environment Canada ensures that it continues to comply with the Cabinet Directive and develops quality SEAs that consider potential effects on the FSDS goals and targets. A departmental policy on SEA establishes the core elements of a well-functioning SEA management system (e.g., clear accountabilities and procedures, updated guidance materials and a comprehensive SEA tracking system).

Environment Canada will continue to implement its SEA policy and further strengthen its SEA performance by ensuring that

  • high-quality SEAs are completed for policy, plan and program proposals as required by the Cabinet Directive;
  • SEAs include a detailed analysis of the potential effects of proposals on the achievement of the FSDS goals and targets;
  • SEAs include measures to mitigate negative environmental effects and enhance positive environmental effects (including effects on the FSDS goals and targets);
  • public statements are issued when SEAs have been formally approved or announced; and
  • departmental support is provided for requests from other departments and agencies for expert policy, technical and scientific analysis on sustainable development, and the potential environmental effects of initiatives.

Environment Canada’s 2014–2015 Departmental Performance Report will include a description of how policies, plans and programs subject to SEAs have affected or are expected to affect progress towards the FSDS goals and targets.

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Section 4: Department-led FSDS Targets

The image of the letter "a" above a leaf represents Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1: Climate Change

In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.

FSDS TargetPerformance Indicator

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions 17% by 2020.

  • Expected impact of actions to meet the reduction target.

Target 1.2: Climate Change Adaptation

Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.

  • Measuring adaptation is complex, given the broad nature and scope of potential impacts. In the short term, measurement for the FSDS will focus on measures of the performance of specific government actions that are expected to be available for inclusion in the next FSDS Progress Report. These may be complemented in the future by additional indicators that measure adaptation outcomes for Canada more broadly.

Goal 2: Air Pollution

Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

FSDS TargetPerformance Indicator

Target 2.1: Outdoor Air Pollutants

Improve outdoor air quality by ensuring compliance with new or amended regulated emission limits by 2020 and thus reducing emissions of air pollutants in support of Air Quality Management System (AQMS) objectives.

  • Air pollutant emissions of sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, particulate matter, carbon monoxide and ammonia.

The image of the letter "w" above a leaf represents Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity

Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

FSDS TargetPerformance Indicator

Target 3.3: Great Lakes – Canadian Areas of Concern

Take federal actions to restore beneficial uses for delisting 5 Canadian Areas of Concern and to reduce the number of impaired beneficial uses in the remaining Areas of Concern by 25% by 2018.

  • Restoring the Great Lakes Areas of Concern.

Target 3.4: Great Lakes

Contribute to the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes by developing and gaining bi-national acceptance of objectives for the management of nutrients in Lake Erie by 2016 and for the other Great Lakes as required.

  • Phosphorus levels in the Great Lakes.

Target 3.5: St. Lawrence River

Take federal actions to reduce pollutants in order to improve water quality, conserve biodiversity and ensure beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence River by 2016.

  • Phosphorus levels in the St. Lawrence River.

Target 3.6: Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay

Reduce an estimated 2000 kg of phosphorus loadings to Lake Simcoe by 2017, which will support the Province of Ontario’s target to reduce phosphorus inputs into Lake Simcoe to 44 000 kg/year by 2045. Reduce an estimated 2000 kg of phosphorus loadings to South-eastern Georgian Bay watersheds by 2017.

  • Reducing phosphorus loads to Lake Simcoe.

Target 3.7: Lake Winnipeg Basin

By 2017, reduce phosphorus inputs to water bodies in the Lake Winnipeg Basin, in support of the Province of Manitoba’s overall plan to reduce phosphorus in Lake Winnipeg by 50% to pre‑1990 levels.

  • Nitrogen and phosphorus levels in Lake Winnipeg.
  • Reducing phosphorus loads to Lake Winnipeg.

Target 3.9: Marine Pollution – Disposal at Sea

Ensure that permitted disposal at sea is sustainable, such that 85% of disposal site monitoring events do not identify the need for site management action (such as site closure) from 2013 to 2016.

  • Monitored disposal at sea sites requiring no management action.

Target 3.11: Wastewater and Industrial Effluent

Reduce risks associated with effluent from wastewater (sewage) and industrial sectors by 2020.

  • Wastewater effluent quality – percentage of wastewater systems whose releases achieve regulatory limits.
  • Wastewater effluent loading – loading of biological oxygen demand matter and suspended solids.
  • Metal mining effluent quality – percentage of facilities whose releases achieve regulatory limits.
  • Pulp and paper effluent quality – percentage of facilities whose releases achieve regulatory limits.

Target 3.12: Water Resource Management

Facilitate sustainable water resource management through the collection of data and the development and dissemination of knowledge from 2013 to 2016.

  • Overall client satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent) towards Environment Canada’s delivery of the Hydrometric Program.

The image of the letter "n" above a leaf represents Theme III: Protecting Nature of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians

Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians

Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.

FSDS TargetPerformance Indicator

Target 4.1: Species at Risk

By 2020, populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.

  • Species at risk population trends.

 

Target 4.2: Migratory Birds

Improve the proportion of migratory bird species that meet their population goals.

  • Proportion of species that are within acceptable bounds of their population goals.

Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship

Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland waters are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.

 

Habitat-conserved indicators:

  • Land secured by Environment Canada and partners as a percentage of the total amount needed to achieve waterfowl population goals.
  • Total land area and shoreline that have been improved or restored to benefit wildlife under the Habitat Stewardship Program.
  • Total land area identified that is key to the conservation of migratory birds and species at risk.
  • Percentage of total terrestrial territory (including inland waters) conserved in protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.

Target 4.6: Invasive Alien Species

By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

  • Number of known new invasive alien species in Canada, by federal regulatory status
  • Percent of federally regulated foreign invasive alien species not established in Canada

Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies

Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.Footnote 3

Number of environmental emergencies at facilities subject to environmental emergency regulations.

Target 4.8: Chemicals Management

Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.Footnote 4

Indicators:Footnote 5

  • Reduce releases of harmful substances (mercury, cadmium, lead and isoprene) to the environment.
  • Reduce concentrations of harmful substances in the environment - In 80% of drainage regions where Canadian or Federal Environmental Quality Guidelines are not exceeded for selected substances (Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) in fish and sediment 2014–15, Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in water and fish 2013–14, Bisphenol A (BPA) targets to be confirmed).

Footnotes

Footnote 3

Environment Canada shares responsibility for this target with Public Safety Canada.

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Footnote 4

Environment Canada shares responsibility for this target with Health Canada.

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Footnote 5

Due to the long-term nature of the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) and the range of substances being addressed, it is not possible to indicate quantitative progress toward Target 4.8 within the time frame of the FSDS 2013–16. Approaches for reporting progress will continue to evolve over the duration of the CMP as trends are identified.

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Section 5: Departmental Implementation Strategies

Sustainable development and activities related to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy are an integral part of Environment Canada’s programming. The Department has made considerable efforts to align and integrate FSDS implementation strategies with its programs as defined by the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA).

In this context, the Department’s Performance Measurement Framework (i.e. expected results, performance indicators, and targets) for specific sub-programs or sub-sub-programs are providing the expected results and indicators for the FSDS implementation strategies. While some of the targets relate to future time periods, actual values for the indicators will be reported on a more frequent basis, often annually.


EC Strategic Outcome 1

EC Strategic Outcome 2

EC Strategic Outcome 3


EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.1 – Biodiversity Policy and Priorities

Program Description

This program enables Environment Canada to play a national leading role in engaging stakeholders, provincial and territorial governments, and other federal government departments in Canada’s implementation of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. The program provides scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision makers, and develops and applies models for social, cultural and economic valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision-making. This work enables information about the ecosystem and the environmental effects of development proposals to be factored into decisions across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, the industrial sector, research community and the general public. Strategies used in Canada include the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy, Biodiversity Outcomes Framework, and Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources. Canada also participates internationally in the Convention on Biological Diversity; the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources; the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress under the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; and Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna under the Arctic Council. The program also serves as the Canadian lead and national focal point for the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Program funding includes Canada’s annual contribution to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and support for international working groups.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Biodiversity goals and targets are integrated into federal, provincial and territorial strategies and plans that have an impact on biodiversity

Indicator

Percentage of federal departments with natural resource or environmental mandates, provinces and territories that have identified and are implementing measures to enhance biodiversity

Target

100% by September 2014

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.3.1: Lead Canada’s implementation of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity with stakeholders, provincial governments and other federal government departments and represent Canada’s domestic interests in other international fora (e.g., Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-Sharing, Liability and Redress under the Biosafety Protocol; Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna under the Arctic Council). (EC)

4.3.2: Serve as Canadian lead and national focal point for the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). (EC)

4.3.8: Provide scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision makers, and develop and apply models for social, cultural and economic valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision-making so that ecosystem information and environmental effects of development proposals can be factored into decisions. (EC, IC, StatCan)


Implementation Strategies 4.3.1, 4.3.2, 4.3.8 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.3 – Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.2 – Species at Risk
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.1 – Species at Risk Operations

Program Description

This program provides the basic components of Environment Canada’s Species at Risk program. It supports decisions by the Minister to add, reclassify or remove species listed under the Species at Risk Act. For those species for which Environment Canada is responsible and that are listed as extirpated, endangered or threatened, the program prepares recovery strategies and action plans (including the identification of critical habitat). It also completes management plans for species of special concern and evaluates populations and threats to listed species. The program supports other federal departments, such as Fisheries and Oceans Canada, in implementing priority recovery strategies, management, and action plans in federal lands and waters, and for federal species as identified in recovery documents. It also supports cooperative arrangements with provinces and territories to implement recovery actions consistent with the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk and bilateral agreements resulting from the Act. The program is also responsible for general administration of the Act (including an annual report to Parliament, issuance of permits under the Act, support for the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk and the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, and maintenance of a public registry). The program fulfills Canada’s obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora by effective implementation of the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act, which controls the import, export and movement within Canada of endangered species, ensuring no species is threatened by international trade.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Recovery strategies or management plans that are publicly available are in place for all listed species for which Environment Canada is responsible

Indicator

Percentage of listed wildlife species for which Environment Canada is responsible with a recovery strategy or management plan that is posted as proposed or final on the Species at Risk public registry within legislative timeframes

Target

100% by March 2018

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.1.5: Continue to lead and cooperate under the National Recovery Program (RENEW) with provinces and territories, consistent with the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk. (EC)

4.1.6: Fulfill the federal government's obligations under the Species at Risk Act to evaluate populations and to add, reclassify or remove species listed under the Act and plan for their recovery. This includes the general administration of the Act (including an annual report to Parliament, issuance of permits under the Act, support for the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk and the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, and maintenance of a public registry). (EC)

4.1.7: Fulfill Canada’s obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora through the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act by helping to ensure that the status of no species is threatened by international trade. (EC)

4.1.8: Enhance the implementation of the Species at Risk Act within DFO and EC to protect and recover species at risk relative to their respective mandates by preparing recovery strategies, and management and action plans as applicable. (DFO, EC)


Implementation Strategies 4.1.5, 4.1.6, 4.1.7, 4.1.8 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, .

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.2 – Species at Risk
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2 – Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk

Program Description

This program supports the delivery of Environment Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act by funding projects led by Aboriginal organizations and Aboriginal communities across Canada. Collaboration with Aboriginal peoples is key to the protection of species at risk, to the Species at Risk Program results, and to meeting the Department’s core obligations. The funded projects build Aboriginal knowledge and expertise in dealing with species at risk. This enables Aboriginal peoples to actively participate in the conservation and recovery of listed species under the Act, and to protect and recover critical habitat or habitat important for species at risk on First Nations reserves, or on land and waters traditionally used by Aboriginal peoples.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Participation in programs to conserve and protect species at risk on aboriginal lands

Indicator

Number of organizations receiving project funding

Target

75 by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

4.1.3: Support the development of Aboriginal knowledge and expertise in dealing with species at risk, so that Aboriginal peoples can actively participate in the conservation and recovery of listed species and protect and recover critical habitat or habitat important for species at risk on First Nations reserves or on land and waters traditionally used by Aboriginal peoples. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 4.1.3 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.1 – Species at Risk.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.2 – Species at Risk
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.3 – Habitat Stewardship Program

Program Description

This program supports the delivery of Environment Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act by funding projects aimed at the protection or conservation of habitats for species listed under the Act as “at risk” (endangered, threatened or of special concern), mainly on non-Aboriginal land. This program engages Canadians in conservation activities to conserve biodiversity, promote the participation of local communities with the recovery of species at risk, and prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern. It allocates funds to a variety of partners (non-governmental organizations, community groups, Aboriginal organizations and communities, private corporations, educational institutions, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, and Crown corporations) to meet regional and national priorities.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Important habitat is secured, protected, improved and/or restored to enhance the recovery of species at risk

Indicators

Total land area that has been improved or restored to benefit wildlife in: (i) hectares and (ii) kilometres of shoreline

Target

(i) 30,000 and (ii) 300 by March 2015

Total land area (in hectares) that has been (i) secured, (ii) protected (new), or (iii) protected (renewed)

(i) 5,000 (ii) 20,000 (iii) 150,000 by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

4.1.4: Engage Canadians in conservation actions to conserve biodiversity through protecting or conserving habitats for species at risk by promoting the participation of local communities to help with the recovery of species at risk, and prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern to meet regional and national priorities. (EC)

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Implementation Strategy 4.1.4 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.1 – Species at Risk.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.3 – Migratory Birds

Program Description

This program protects and conserves populations of migratory bird species. It is responsible for implementing the Migratory Birds Convention signed with the United States in 1916, via the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. Activities include conserving populations, individual birds, and their nests and habitats through continued conservation actions, stewardship, policy development, and enforcement of the Act and its regulations. It also protects important bird habitats, minimizes other stressors that affect population status, and manages emergencies regarding health and safety issues associated with migratory birds. The program implements recommendations of the review of migratory bird monitoring programs. It is responsible, as a signatory to the North American Bird Conservation Initiative, for ensuring that all conservation plans for North America’s 12 Bird Conservation Regions, and similarly the 25 Bird Conservation Region Strategies are publicly available, in addition to carrying out actions for priority migratory bird species as indicated by the Bird Conservation Regions plans. The Migratory Birds program is delivered in partnership with other governments and inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations. Client groups include the Canadian public, game bird hunters, Aboriginal people (subsistence harvesting), natural resource economic sectors and natural resource users, and other governments (provincial/territorial and foreign).

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Migratory bird populations maintained at population goals

Indicator

Proportion of migratory bird species for which data is available meeting population goals

Target

To be determined once bird population goals are agreed upon

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.2.1: Fulfill Canada’s obligations under the Migratory Bird Convention of 1916 between Canada and the U.S. as implemented in Canada under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. This includes conserving populations, individual birds, their nests, and important bird habitat through continued conservation actions, stewardship, policy development, and enforcement of the Act and its regulations. (EC)

4.2.2: Complete and make publicly available each of the 25 Bird Conservation Region Strategies, and ensure that recommended actions from these strategies are implemented for priority migratory bird species. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 4.2.1, 4.2.2 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.2 – Migratory Birds.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.4 – Wildlife Habitat Conservation
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.4.1 – Habitat Conservation Partnerships

Program Description

This program supports the delivery of Environment Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and the Canada Wildlife Act. It does this by funding projects and encouraging activities that secure, protect, improve and/or restore important and ecologically sensitive habitat to enhance the survival of wildlife, and, in particular, species at risk and migratory birds. The program provides mechanisms to engage organizations and individuals, including owners, environmental organizations and others. It also encourages voluntary action by other levels of government and non-government, Aboriginal groups and private-sector partners through mechanisms such as tax incentives (the Ecological Gifts Program) and funding initiatives. This program also includes Environment Canada’s participation in the implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, a Canada–United States–Mexico partnership of federal, provincial/state and non-governmental organizations that aims to conserve wetlands in North America, and the implementation of the Ramsar Convention. The program also coordinates the federal government’s response to the 2004 Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada which is implemented by federal science-based and regulatory departments and agencies, including the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Program delivery includes contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat, and those to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention).

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Results

Indicators

Targets

Important and ecologically-sensitive habitat is secured, protected, improved and/or restored to enhance the survival of wildlife, in particular, species at risk and migratory birds

Cumulative total ecologically-sensitive land area (in hectares) secured and protected (Ecological Gifts Program)

159,225 ha by March 2015

Habitats that are needed to achieve waterfowl population goals are enhanced

Total land area secured by Environment Canada and its partners under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan to achieve population goals for all priority waterfowl

1,660,867 ha by December 2017

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.3.4: Provide for the protection of priority habitats required for the conservation of migratory birds and species at risk, as well as unique and rare habitats, by managing a network of National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and Marine Wildlife Areas that is planned to adapt to ecological change; administering the Ecological Gifts Program; contributing to the development and implementation of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan; administering permits; and entering partnership arrangements (including collaboration with Aboriginal groups, other wildlife management agencies, other natural resource agencies, non-governmental organizations, private property owners, and other jurisdictions). (EC)

4.3.7: Work with the U.S. and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to foster conservation. (EC)

4.3.12: Participate in implementing the North American Waterfowl Management Plan which aims to conserve wetlands in order to benefit waterfowl in North America. Canada has committed to promoting the wise use of wetlands and maintaining the ecological character of designated Wetlands of International Importance under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention). (EC)

4.6.1: Coordinate the federal government's response to the 2004 Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada. Implementation is the responsibility of federal science-based and regulatory departments and agencies. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 4.3.4, 4.3.7, 4.3.12 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.3 – Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship.

Implementation Strategy 4.6.1 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.6 – Invasive Alien Species.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.1 – Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Sub-Program 1.1.4 – Wildlife Habitat Conservation
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.4.2 – Protected Areas

Program Description

This program supports the delivery of Environment Canada’s obligations under the Species at Risk Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and the Canada Wildlife Act. This entails managing a network of protected areas (National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and Marine Wildlife Areas) to protect priority habitats required for the conservation of Canada’s migratory birds and species at risk. The program also manages rare or unique habitats planned to adapt to ecological change in conjunction with others; facilitates understanding of ecological processes; and promotes public awareness and understanding of nature conservation and Environment Canada’s role in conservation. The program also carries out the strategic planning, coordination and management of protected areas. Program success involves the support of the public and close collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal groups, other wildlife management agencies, other natural resource agencies, non-governmental organizations and property owners in initiatives such as the Inuit Impact and Benefits Agreement, and the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy to contribute to the further establishment of National Wildlife Areas in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. The program operates as part of a broader network of protected areas that includes sites of other federal departments (notably Parks Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada), provincial and territorial agencies and conservation properties owned and/or managed by non-governmental organizations. The department also undertakes research and provides advice to decision-makers on marine ecosystems, including impacts of environmental stressors on migratory birds, species at risk and ecological risks associated with specific high-priority ocean activities.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Habitat for the conservation of migratory birds, species at risk and rare or unique species is protected

Indicator

Total area that is under legally-binding protection as National Wildlife Areas, Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and Marine Wildlife Areas

Target

12,448,961 ha by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.3.5: Implement the Inuit Impact and Benefits Agreement, and continue to work with the Government of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the NWT Protected Areas Strategy, with the objective of establishing additional Protected Areas in NWT and Nunavut. (EC)

4.3.11: Develop an inventory of protected spaces that includes private conservation areas. (EC)

4.5.4: Undertake research and provide advice to decision-makers on marine ecosystems, including impacts of environmental stressors on migratory birds, species at risk and ecological risks associated with specific high-priority ocean activities. (DFO, EC)


Implementation Strategies 4.3.5, 4.3.11 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.3 – Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship.

Implementation Strategy 4.5.4 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.5 – Marine Ecosystems.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.2 – Water Resources

Sub-Program 1.2.1 – Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health

Program Description

The program supports the water quality-related obligations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Canada Water Act, the Fisheries Act, the International Boundary Waters Treaty Act, and federal/provincial/territorial and Canada–United States water quality agreements. The program provides water quality monitoring and reporting, including through annual reports on the Freshwater Quality Index. The program delivers Environment Canada’s responsibilities under the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative, such as scientific monitoring activities and support for initiatives to increase information-sharing and analysis among partners and networks. This program also coordinates with the United States several research and monitoring activities in the Great Lakes under the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The program collaborates with the Government of Alberta and stakeholders to implement the three-year Joint Canada–Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring. The plan is an integrated approach to monitoring, evaluation, and reporting on the significance of environmental contaminant pathways in air and water, biological effects, and impacts of habitat disturbance from the oil sands. The program also monitors water quality in Canadian shellfish growing areas for the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program, which is administered jointly by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Environment Canada, and Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Canada's water resource policies and programs are informed by water quality and aquatic ecosystem health data and information from ongoing monitoring of waters under federal jurisdiction or responsibility

Indicator

Percentage of sites within Environment Canada's national core water quality monitoring network at which water quality monitoring was performed

Target

100% of sites monitored annually by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.3.5: Coordinate with the U.S. scientific research and monitoring activities in the Great Lakes in order to fulfill the obligations of the Canada-US Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. (EC)

3.7.3: Conduct science and monitoring activities required to understand the relationship between ecology and nutrient cycling and the sources and transport mechanisms for nutrients within Lake Winnipeg and its sub watersheds. This information helps inform the development of nutrient objectives and performance indicators for Lake Winnipeg. (EC)

3.10.4: Working with provincial colleagues through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment, produce a guidance manual for developing nutrient objectives for rivers, and identify additional opportunities for research on mitigating excess nutrients in Canadian waters. (EC)

3.12.3: Collaborate with the Government of Alberta and stakeholders to implement, an industry-funded integrated approach to monitoring, evaluation, and reporting on the significance of environmental contaminant pathways in air and water, biological effects, and impacts of habitat disturbance as described in the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 3.3.5 contributes to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.3 – Great Lakes – Canadian Areas of Concern.

Implementation Strategy 3.7.3 contributes to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.7 – Lake Winnipeg Basin.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.4 contributes to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.10 – Agri-Environmental Performance Metrics.

Implementation Strategy 3.12.3 contributes to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.12 – Water Resource Management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.2 – Water Resources

Sub-Program 1.2.2 – Water Resource Management and Use

Program Description

This program conducts research and monitoring, and advances knowledge on the state of watersheds through the Canadian Council of Ministers on the Environment, in order to support integrated water management decisions at the federal/provincial/territorial levels. It promotes and enables the application of science-based information to inform decision-making in an integrated and coherent manner consistent with the Canada Water Act. The program coordinates water quality and water quantity science and monitoring to inform decisions, policy development and management approaches. The program coordinates with Canadian and U.S. government agencies (e.g., International Joint Commission), and lends expertise to domestic and international water boards on domestic and transboundary issues such as protecting ecosystems, avoiding flooding and providing sufficient flow of water to support economic activities in waterways from Lake Ontario to the St. Lawrence River, Lake Superior to Lake Huron, and in other transboundary rivers.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Water resource decision makers have the necessary information and stakeholder perspectives to make responsible and appropriate shared-resource decisions

Indicator

Client satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)

Target

Target will be set once a baseline value is measured on an annual basis starting in 2014

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.12.7: Continue to engage in domestic water boards (e.g. Prairie Provinces Water Board and Mackenzie River Basin Board) and international water boards (e.g. International Joint Commission) to coordinate on trans-boundary water issues with other Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial agencies and relevant US counterparts (EC).

3.12.8: Continue to work through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment towards a national approach to assess groundwater sustainability in order to support integrated water management decisions at the federal, provincial, and territorial levels. (EC)

3.12.9: Conduct research and monitoring to advance knowledge on the state of Canada’s watersheds. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.12.7, 3.12.8, 3.12.9 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.12 – Water Resource Management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.2 – Water Resources

Sub-Program 1.2.3 – Hydrological Service and Water Survey

Program Description

Information on the water cycle is critical to Canada’s health and safety (e.g., flood forecasting and prevention) and to economic efficiency (e.g., agriculture, hydroelectricity and international shipping), by collecting and disseminating hydrological data and information to support water management decisions. The hydrological data, meteorological and ancillary information provided through program are used by international, federal, provincial, territorial and municipal agencies to regulate and respond to changing water levels and flows within Canada, and in bodies of water that cross international boundaries. Under the Canada Water Act, monitoring activities of this program are carried out through cost-shared bilateral agreements between Environment Canada and each of the provinces and territories (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada represents Nunavut and the Northwest Territories). These agreements create the national framework within which Environment Canada collects, interprets and provides level and flow information, and supports scientific investigations. Delivery of the program involves staff in Environment Canada headquarters and each region. Program delivery may include contributions in support of Water Resources.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Canadians and their institutions have the hydrological data, information and knowledge they need to make water management decisions

Indicator

Client satisfaction index, on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory) to 10 (excellent)

Target

Performance Measurement Framework target will be set once a baseline value is measured in 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

3.12.4: Collect and disseminate hydrological data and knowledge through the Water Survey of Canada, in order to help Canadian jurisdictions make water management decisions that ensure health and safety and support economic efficiency. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 3.12.4 contributes to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.12 – Water Resource Management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Ecosystems

Sub-Program 1.3.2 – Ecosystem Assessment and Approaches

Program Description

This program contributes to a consolidated activity that ensures the assessment, evaluation and management of Canada’s ecosystems in a sustainable manner. These diverse components provide scientific expertise, guidance and advice to decision makers across different levels of government, environmental and non-governmental organizations, industry, the research community and the general public. The goal is to ensure that ecosystem information and environmental effects of development proposals can be factored into their decisions. The program conducts research, monitoring, assessment and reporting on the health of ecosystems and biodiversity. It also monitors biodiversity contaminants as part of the Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Implementation Plan in order to provide an improved understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of oil sands development. Environment Canada participates in federal environmental assessments, including those in the North, and also contributes scientific expertise in territorial and provincial environmental assessments. EC contributes to the health of Canada’s ecosystems through its involvement in these strategic assessments.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Potential significant adverse environmental effects of projects, plans, programs or policies subject to federal environmental assessment legislation and Cabinet Directives are avoided or mitigated

Indicators

Proportion of Environment Canada recommendations that are incorporated into final environmental assessment decisions

Targets

60% by March 2015.

Proportion of environmental assessment follow-up requests made by Environment Canada which perform as anticipated

100% by FY 2016-17

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

4.3.10: Conduct biodiversity contaminants monitoring as part of the Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Implementation Plan in order to provide an improved understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of oil sands development. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 4.3.10 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.3 – Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Analysis in Support of Regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $5.74 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Ecosystems

Sub-Program 1.3.4 – Ecosystems Initiatives
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4.1 – Great Lakes

Program Description

This program provides leadership, oversight, coordination, funding and governance mechanisms for the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative by managing, delivering and reporting on the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA), the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative, the Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP) and the Action Plan for Clean Water (Great Lakes sediment remediation implementation). Work encompasses policy development, issues management, work planning, reporting, co-ordination of science and monitoring, and the development, implementation and analysis of agreements, plans and initiatives. The program achieves results in collaboration with other federal departments and other levels of government in both Canada and the U.S., Aboriginal groups, conservation authorities and watershed management agencies, municipalities, environmental organizations and stewardship networks. Specifically, this program implements remedial action plans and lakewide action and management plans to improve environmental quality and achieve the vision of a healthy, and prosperous Great Lakes ecosystem. It uses targeted funding from the GLAP to restore beneficial use impairments in Areas of Concern, and implements contaminated sediment remediation projects with funding from the Action Plan for Clean Water. Funding from the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative is used to determine phosphorus targets and identify possible actions to reduce levels that contribute to harmful algae. The program also develops action plans and strategies to address evolving and historic issues of emerging concern in the Great Lakes. These issues include species and habitat protection, chemicals of concern to Canada and the U.S., and the identification of climate change impacts on Great Lakes water quality. The program also regularly reports federally and provincially through the COA and bi-nationally through the Canada–U.S. GLWQA. Reporting includes the State of the Great Lakes reports on environmental indicators, the Progress Report of the Parties (Canada–U.S.), updates on lakewide action and management plans, COA progress reports, and a report on groundwater science.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Environment Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in beneficial use impairments and environmental quality of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem

Indicator

Number of beneficial uses whose status is listed as “impaired” or “requires further assessment” for Canada’s 17 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes

Target

0 by March 2030

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.3.1: Provide leadership, oversight, coordination and governance for the Great Lakes by managing, delivering, and reporting on the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative, and the Canada-Ontario Agreement. (DFO, EC)

The plans and strategies on evolving historic issues and issues of emerging concern include:

  • Nutrients – Fulfilling obligations to address phosphorus loads to the Great Lakes.
  • Habitat and species – Fulfilling obligations to address habitat and species protection.
  • Chemicals of mutual concern – Fulfilling obligations to reduce or eliminate the use and release of chemicals of concern (mutually agreed to for action by Canada and the U.S.) using approaches that are accountable, adaptive and science-based.
  • Climate change impacts: Fulfilling obligations to identify and quantify climate change impacts on water quality.

3.3.2: Partner with Canadian and U.S. federal, state, tribal, provincial and municipal governments, First Nations, Metis, watershed management agencies, and other local public agencies to implement Remedial Action Plans and Lakewide Action and Management Plans in order to improve environmental quality and achieve the vision of a healthy, prosperous and Great Lakes region. This includes funding from the Great Lakes Action Plan to coordinate Remedial Action Plans, providing technical and financial support through the Great Lakes Sustainability Fund to clean up and restore the Areas of Concern, and remediating contaminated sediment in Areas of Concern with funding from the Action Plan for Clean Water. (EC)

3.3.4: Release reports regularly on State of the Great Lakes environmental indicators, Progress Report of the Parties (Canada-U.S.), updates for Lakewide Action and Management Plans and a report on groundwater science. (EC)

3.3.6: Deliver and report on Great Lakes results federally-provincially, between the Government of Canada and the Province of Ontario through the Canada-Ontario Agreement and binationally between Canada and the U.S. through the Canada-US Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.4, 3.3.6 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.3 – Great Lakes – Canadian Areas of Concern, and Target 3.4 – Great Lakes – Management of Nutrients.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Ecosystems

Sub-Program 1.3.4 – Ecosystems Initiatives
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4.2 – St. Lawrence

Program Description

This program provides leadership, oversight and coordination to the overall governance of the St. Lawrence Action Plan, and reports results achieved between the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec. It works to establish cooperative partnerships between the federal and provincial governments to address biodiversity conservation, water quality improvement and sustainability of beneficial uses. It also supports stakeholder participation in collaboration processes and communities in improving environmental quality through grants and contribution agreements. The program conducts and coordinates prediction and monitoring activities in the St. Lawrence with other federal and provincial departments, and releases reports regularly on the State of the St. Lawrence and factsheets on 21 environmental indicators, as well as results of the St. Lawrence Action Plan.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Environment Canada and partners achieve near-term objectives for improvements in water quality, biodiversity conservation and beneficial uses in the St. Lawrence ecosystem

Indicators

Average number of participating external organizations per project funded by Environment Canada under the St. Lawrence Action Plan

Targets

3 by March 2016

Funds contributed by non-federal government organizations per dollar contributed by Environment Canada to projects under the St. Lawrence Action Plan

3.5 by March 2016

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.5.1: Provide leadership, oversight, and coordination to the overall governance of the St. Lawrence Action Plan and report results achieved between the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec. (EC)

3.5.2: Establish cooperative partnerships between the federal and provincial governments to address biodiversity conservation, water quality improvement and sustainability of beneficial uses, and support stakeholder participation in collaboration processes and communities in improving environmental quality through Grants and Contribution Agreements. (EC)

3.5.3: Conduct and coordinate prediction and monitoring activities in the St. Lawrence with other federal and provincial departments and release reports regularly on the State of the St. Lawrence and factsheets on 21 environmental indicators. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.5.1, 3.5.2, 3.5.3 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.5 – St. Lawrence River.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Ecosystems

Sub-Program 1.3.4 – Ecosystems Initiatives
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4.3 – Lake Simcoe/South-Eastern Georgian Bay

Program Description

This program provides financial and technical support through the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund to implement priority projects through contributions to citizens, non-governmental organizations, provincial ministries, conservation authorities, landowners, universities and industry. The Fund also supports key research within federal departments. Priority objectives of the Fund are to support projects which improve monitoring, assessment and information required to improve decision making for phosphorus reduction strategies; conserve critical aquatic habitat and associated species through targeted aquatic habitat protection, restoration and creation; reduce rural and urban non-point sources of nutrients including implementation of best management practices for the management of soil, crops, livestock, etc. and creating and rehabilitating wetlands and naturalizing watercourses; and, reduce discharges of phosphorus from point sources including sewage, combined sewer overflows and urban storm water systems including support to development and testing of innovative approaches to manage urban storm water and wastewater. The initiative is administered by Environment Canada’s Lake Simcoe / South-Eastern Georgian Bay office in consultation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Province of Ontario, Lake Simcoe Conservation Authority and other key stakeholders. Program investments are expected to improve water quality for recreational use, substantially reduce phosphorus loads from urban and rural sources, and advance the restoration of a sustainable cold-water fishery, as well as ecological integrity. This initiative is a key component of the Government’s Action Plan for Clean Water and supports commitments of the federal government related to the Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Environment Canada and partners achieve reductions in phosphorus loads and restoration and protection of fish and aquatic dependent wildlife populations of Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay

Indicator

Estimated annual reductions in phosphorus inputs to the Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay watersheds due to projects supported by the program

Target

4,000 kg by March 2017

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

3.6.1: Provide financial and technical support through the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund to implement priority projects aimed at reducing phosphorus inputs, conserving aquatic habitat and species, and enhancing research and monitoring capacity essential to the restoration of the Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay Basin watersheds. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 3.6.1 contributes to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.6 – Lake Simcoe and South-eastern Georgian Bay.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Ecosystems

Sub-Program 1.3.4 – Ecosystems Initiatives
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4.4 – Lake Winnipeg

Program Description

The Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative focuses on three key areas: science (research, information and monitoring); transboundary partnerships; and the implementation and administration of the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund. This fund supports projects to improve water quality by identifying, assessing, and addressing key issues such as pollutants and nutrient loads in the lake and its contributing watershed. National science and governance initiatives, aligned to the Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems Health program (1.2.1), also support the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative. The Lake Winnipeg Basin Office coordinates and manages the activities of the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative. It works with existing water governance bodies; explores options and opportunities to cooperatively develop, and support implementation of a basin-wide nutrient strategy; and provides a forum for communication. This includes working with the Province of Manitoba to continue implementation of the Canada–Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg, which provides for a long-term collaborative and coordinated approach between the two governments to ensure the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin. The program also financially supports the ongoing development and expansion of the single-window Web information portal, housed at the University of Manitoba, to better promote and enable data sharing and analysis with partners and other networks, in order to support research on Lake Winnipeg.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Reduced nutrient loading in the Lake Winnipeg basin

Indicator

Estimated reduction of phosphorus load in the Lake Winnipeg basin resulting from projects funded by Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund

Target

10,800 kg by March 2017

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.7.1: The Lake Winnipeg Basin Management Office will coordinate and manage the activities of the Lake Winnipeg Basin Initiative, work with existing water governance bodies, explore options and opportunities to cooperatively develop and support the implementation of a basin-wide nutrient strategy, and provide a forum for communication. This includes working with the Province of Manitoba to continue implementation of the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg, which provides for a long-term collaborative and coordinated approach between the two governments to ensure the sustainability and health of the Lake Winnipeg Basin. (EC)

3.7.2: Provide financial and technical support, through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund, to projects having concrete, demonstrable results to reduce pollutants and, in particular, nutrient loads, throughout the Lake Winnipeg Basin. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.7.1 and 3.7.2 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.7 – Lake Winnipeg Basin.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Ecosystems

Sub-Program 1.3.4 – Ecosystems Initiatives
Sub-Sub-Program 1.3.4.5 – Community Ecosystem Partnerships

Program Description

This program maintains and restores the beneficial uses and environmental quality of targeted ecosystems of federal interest, such as northern Canada, the Georgia and Okanagan Basins, and coastal ecosystems in Atlantic Canada (through the Atlantic Ecosystem Initiative). The program coordinates and oversees initiatives in these targeted ecosystems. The initiatives use strategic partnerships, research, science, and funding programs to support community ecosystem projects and partnerships. It works collaboratively with other regional partners in Atlantic Canada to advance efforts to conserve and restore important habitat, improve water quality, and better address the impacts of climate change. The program uses mechanisms such as the Canada-U.S. Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment 2012–2017 Action Plan. The goal is to expand knowledge, increase stakeholder capacity and involvement, improve decision-making and increase use of best practices to address complex environmental issues regarding water resources. The program is aimed at several levels of government, communities, businesses, industry, Aboriginal groups, non-governmental organizations and academia. It works to cooperate on opportunities to move forward on issues such as lake evaporation in the Okanagan Basin ecosystem and sustainability indicators that incorporate First Nations traditional knowledge in the Okanagan and Salish Sea ecosystems.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Achievement of objectives for improvements in beneficial uses and environmental quality in priority ecosystems set by Environment Canada and collaborating organizations

Indicators

Number of collaborative projects that address priority issues within the Atlantic ecozone are initiated or completed

Targets

> 15 by April 2016

Number of partnerships or collaborative arrangements established or maintained to implement an ecosystem based approach to environmental management in the Atlantic ocozone

> 5 by April 2016

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.12.1: Deliver, with the Atlantic provinces, collaborative environmental initiatives that advance long-term coordinated approaches to water management that ensure the sustainability and health of water resources in Atlantic Canada. (EC)

3.12.10: Continue to cooperate on ecosystem initiatives such as lake evaporation in the Okanagan ecosystem and sustainability indicators that incorporate First Nations traditional knowledge in the Salish Sea ecosystem. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.12.1 and 3.12.10 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – Water Quality and Water Quantity, Target 3.12 – Water Resource Management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 1

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

Program 1.4 – Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife

Program Description

This program works to conserve and protect the natural environment through compliance promotion and enforcement of the Species at Risk Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act, and the Canada Wildlife Act. The program promotes compliance through the communication of information, education and consultation with parties affected by the statutes. It maintains a contingent of enforcement officers, whose activities include verifying conformity and bringing back conformity with laws, regulations and permits pertaining to wildlife and Environment Canada protected areas, as well as gathering intelligence, conducting inspections and pursuing investigations regarding alleged offenders. The program also works with the United States and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen wildlife enforcement. These actions work to reduce damages and threats to biodiversity for the benefit of Canadians and the international community.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Compliance with wildlife laws and regulations administered by Environment Canada

Indicator

Percentage of the inspected regulated community that is compliant with regulatory requirements under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994

Target

90% by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.1.2: Work with the U.S. and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen wildlife enforcement. (EC)

4.3.3: Enhance and promote enforcement in Environment Canada Protected Areas (Migratory Bird Sanctuaries and National Wildlife Areas) through a contingent of enforcement officers and take appropriate enforcement measures against alleged offenders. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 4.1.2 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.1 – Species at Risk.

Implementation Strategy 4.3.3 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.3 – Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat Stewardship.

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EC Strategic Outcome 2

Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions

Program 2.1 – Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Sub-Program 2.1.2 – Health-Related Meteorological Information

Program Description

This program provides forecasts, tools and information on atmospheric conditions that affect health, such as air quality, extreme temperatures and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It supports the mandates of Environment Canada, Health Canada and many public and non-governmental health agencies. The program includes work on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) and other projects that assist Canadians in making informed decisions to protect their health and reduce pollution, and enable health agencies to help vulnerable populations to respond to changing atmospheric conditions. It is delivered across Canada through collaborations promoting data and information dissemination. Collaborators include the media, public health agencies at all levels of government, provincial environment agencies and non-governmental agencies. This program also includes conducting systematic observations and monitoring of background air pollutant monitoring (CAPMon Network) and ozone in the atmosphere and hosting the World Ozone and UV Data Centre, operated on behalf of the World Meteorological Organization and used by over 75 government agencies around the world. Program delivery may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Canadians have the information they need to protect their health against risks related to air quality and other atmospheric conditions

Indicators

Percentage of targeted sensitive populations within selected regions receiving information on the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information

Targets

15-25% of sensitive population (range is due to regional variation) by March 2016

Percentage of the general population within selected regions receiving Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) who report that they recall seeing or hearing AQHI information

15-20% of general population (range is due to regional variation) by March 2016

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

2.1.11: Communicate outdoor air pollution health risks to Canadians through the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI), which provides current and forecast air-quality information and advice on health risks in order to assist Canadians in making decisions on how to reduce their level of exposure. Continue development of the AQHI and continue implementation in all provinces and major communities in the North to achieve access for 80% of the Canadian population. (EC, HC)


Implementation Strategy 2.1.11 contributes to FSDS Goal 2 – Air Pollution, Target 2.1 – Outdoor Air Pollutants.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Data collection and reporting for atmospheric pollutants

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $8.21 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 2

Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions

Program 2.1 – Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Sub-Program 2.1.3 – Climate Information, Predictions and Tools

Program Description

This program generates new knowledge and information about past, present and future states of the climate system and how it functions, as well as the changing composition of the atmosphere and its impacts. Its work includes developing global and regional climate models and scenarios; detecting human influence on climate change in Canada, including extremes; understanding the North and Canadian cryosphere; and tracking atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and aerosols across Canada, including in remote locations. These activities increase understanding of the impacts of climate change on economic sectors and ecosystems. Results from the program’s analysis and research activities provide the scientific basis for policy development, mitigation, adaptation planning and decision-making to programs such as the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework, as well as products, services and tools to Canadians. In particular, climate services inform and assist users in adapting to both present climate variability and medium- to long-term changes in climate. The program shares data, science and information with all levels of government in Canada, academia, industry, consortia, standards councils, and the national and international scientific community, including organizations such as the World Meteorological Organization, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. The program meets responsibilities under the Department of the Environment Act, Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1999), Emergency Management Act (2007) and the National Research Council Act (Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes), and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Articles 4 and 5: monitoring and research). Program delivery may include grants and contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Clients and users have the information they require on climate projections, scenarios and climate data sets on various time and spatial scales

Indicator

Annual number of downloads of climate datasets

Target

25,000 by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategy:

1.2.12: Support adaptation decision making by providing the foundational science information to understand climate system behaviour, the human influence on climate, and future climate on various spatial and temporal scales. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 1.2.12 contributes to FSDS Goal 1 – Climate Change, Target 1.2 – Climate Change Adaptation.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Climate Change Prediction and Scenarios Program

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $5.90 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.1 – Substances and Waste Management

Sub-Program 3.1.1 – Substances Management

Program Description

This program is jointly implemented by Health Canada and Environment Canada. It is responsible for assessing all targeted existing commercial substances identified under the Chemicals Management Plan, as well as new substances, upon notification by industry of their import or manufacture, for risks to the environment. The program uses science-based risk assessment, priority-setting and timely regulatory actions (or other measures where appropriate) to manage these substances. It works to improve substance management through research and monitoring, and tracking of pollutant releases through reporting to the National Pollutant Release Inventory and ensures appropriate risk measures are in place, as well as engaging in national and international collaborations. The program maintains transparency with stakeholders through consultation processes. International obligations include the Basel, Rotterdam Convention and Stockholm Conventions, the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution and the Minamata Convention. Program delivery includes the assessed contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. This program also uses regulations and other control measures to address the risks posed by end-of-life substances of concern, international and interprovincial movement of waste and hazardous recyclable material.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Reduced releases to the environment of toxic and other substances of concern

Indicator

Canadian releases of selected controlled substances

Target

80% reduction by March 2016

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.8.3: Percentage of stated objectives to be achieved in international negotiations which were met or mostly met under the Basel, Rotterdam, Stockholm and Vienna Conventions. (EC)

4.8.5: Assess 100% of 1500 targeted existing commercial substances as identified under the Chemicals Management Plan for risks to human health and/or the environment by 2016. (EC, HC)

4.8.6: Track releases of harmful substances under the National Pollutant Release Inventory in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (EC)

4.8.8: Address 100% of new substances, for which Environment Canada has been notified by industry of their intended manufacture or import, to determine if they may pose risks to human health and/or the environment within the timelines in the regulation or established services standards. (EC, HC)

4.8.9: Ensure at least one risk management measure is in place for 100% of substances deemed to be harmful to human health and/or the environment. (EC, HC)


Implementation Strategies 4.8.3, 4.8.5, 4.8.6, 4.8.8, and 4.8 9 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.8 – Chemicals Management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.1 – Substances and Waste Management

Sub-Program 3.1.2 – Effluent Management

Program Description

This program manages the risks to the environment and human health from the discharge and deposit of waste residues (e.g., effluent). It does this by developing, implementing and administering strategies and programs, such as pollution prevention plans, regulations, codes of practice, guidelines and environmental performance agreements. It works under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and the Fisheries Act to address waste discharges and substances of concern from industrial and public sectors, including but not limited to the mining and processing, forestry, waste water and other sectors. Key activities include conducting research and risk analysis; developing and implementing regulations and other control instruments; assessing the results of environmental effects monitoring of regulated facilities; providing technical advice to environmental assessments; and acting as the focal point for the Department for the Fisheries Act Pollution Prevention Provisions (FA-PPP). Specifically, the program administers the FA-PPP, including the development of risk management instruments; administers the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations to reduce the threats to fish, fish habitat and human health from fish consumption; works with the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador on minimum effluent quality standards for wastewater effluent for the Far North; works to amend the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations to include the Far North, and administers the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations and the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act to control or manage the deposit of deleterious substances into water to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Prevention of effluent pollution from sectors regulated under the Fisheries Act

Indicators

Percentage of facilities whose releases are within regulated limits and meet effluent non-lethality requirements

Targets

95% by March 2015

Loading (in tonnes) of biological oxygen demand (BOD) matter and total suspended solids from wastewater treatment facilities subject to federal regulations

To be determined

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.11.1: Administer the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations to reduce the threats to fish, fish habitat, and human health from fish consumption. (EC)

3.11.2: Continue to work with the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Quebec, and Newfoundland and Labrador on minimum effluent quality standards for wastewater effluent for the far north. (EC)

3.11.3: Administer the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act to control or manage the deposit of selected deleterious substances into water to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems. (EC)

3.11.4: Administer the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act to control or manage the deposit of selected deleterious substances into water to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems. (EC)

4.8.12: Administer the Fisheries Act Pollution Prevention Provisions (FA-PPP) including the development of risk management instruments. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.11.1, 3.11.2, 3.11.3 and 3.11.4 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – water quality and water quantity, Target 3.11 – wastewater and industrial effluent.

Implementation Strategy 4.8.12 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.8 – chemicals management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.1 – Substances and Waste Management

Sub-Program 3.1.3 – Marine Pollution

Program Description

This program assesses, controls and monitors the disposal of wastes and other matter at sea and advises on marine pollution from ships. Since 2010, the program also has responsibility for assessing and controlling the risk of impacts to the marine environment resulting from Canadians or Canadian maritime traffic in the Antarctic. The program uses a mix of regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to prevent marine pollution. It addresses impacts on sediments and other wastes; administers prohibitions and controls, assesses and issues permits for disposal at sea and Antarctic expeditions; and researches and develops decision‑making and monitoring tools, and standards. The program contributes to federal coordination of marine pollution prevention (ship-sourced); It works under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, including Part 7, Division 3 (Disposal at Sea), and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act, 2003. The program also meets international obligations, including the London Convention and Protocol, the Antarctic Treaty and Madrid Protocol, and works to advance Canadian positions to influence global rules toward reducing and managing global marine pollution from all sources. Two cost recovery fees are applicable to disposal at sea permits: an application fee assessed on all permits, and a permit fee assessed on dredged and inert inorganic material.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Reduced marine pollution from uncontrolled dumping at sea

Indicator

Percentage of disposal site monitoring events that do not require site management action

Target

85% by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

3.9.1 Complementary to 3.8, set the regulatory frameworks through domestic legislation and international conventions that govern the protection of the marine environment from pollution from disposal at sea, and advance Canadian positions that can influence global rules towards reducing and managing global marine pollution from all sources. (EC)

3.9.2 Contribute to reducing pollution from disposal at sea through permit assessment and monitoring to ensure sustainability in compliance with Canadian legislation such as the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 3.9.1 and 3.9.2 contribute to FSDS Goal 3 – water quality and water quantity, Target 3.9 – marine pollution – disposal at sea.

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.1 – Substances and Waste Management

Sub-Program 3.1.4 – Environmental Emergencies

Program Description

This program aims to reduce the frequency and consequences of spills and related environmental emergencies involving toxic and other hazardous substances. The program conducts five major activities: prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and research and development. Prevention involves regulating chemical facilities to develop and implement environmental emergency plans. Preparedness includes coordinating and planning international, national and regional environmental emergency preparedness capabilities, as well as sensitivity mapping. Response includes monitoring the actions of responsible parties, providing scientific and technical advice on weather and sea state, and on behaviour and effects of chemicals; providing sensitivity mapping and trajectory modelling; attending significant incidents; and operating the 24/7 National Environmental Emergencies Centre in Montréal. Recovery activities include assessing the damage and providing advice to polluters on repairing an environment damaged by an environmental emergency. Other activities include development of spill models, analysis methods, fate and behaviour algorithms, measurement and remote‑sensing capabilities, decontamination protocols and counter-measures used during incidents.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Results

Regulatees comply with the requirements and obligations of the Environmental Emergency Regulations

Indicators

Percentage of facilities requiring environmental emergency plans that have them in place as required by the Environmental Emergency Regulations

Targets

100% by March 2015

Stable or reduced frequency of environmental emergencies in facilities subject to the Environmental Emergency Regulations

Percentage of regulated facilities subject to the Environmental Emergency regulations and that have an E2 plan that have environmental emergencies

Maintain at 1% by March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.7.4 In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable. (AAFC, AANDC, DFO, EC, HC, IC, NRCan, PC, PS, PWGSC, TC)

Specific examples include:

  • Develop spill and dispersion models, analysis methods, fate and behaviour algorithms, measurement and remote sensing capabilities, decontamination protocols, and countermeasures used during incidents. (EC)
  • Reduce the environmental consequences of spills by providing scientific and technical advice on weather, sea state and the behaviour and effects of chemicals, sampling and analysis, countermeasures, sensitivity mapping, trajectory, modelling, and operation of the 24/7 National Environmental Emergencies Centre in Montreal. (EC)

4.7.5 Prevent emergencies by promoting compliance, track and report number of environmental emergency plans in place as required by the Environmental Emergency Regulations, created pursuant to section 200 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 4.7.4 and 4.7.5 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.7 – Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies.

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.1 – Substances and Waste Management

Sub-Program 3.1.5 – Contaminated Sites

Program Description

This program is primarily directed to Environment Canada’s responsibilities in supporting the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). The FCSAP is a 15-year Government of Canada horizontal program with the aim of reducing environmental and human health risks from known federal contaminated sites and associated federal financial liabilities. Sixteen federal departments, agencies and consolidated Crown corporations responsible for contaminated sites, including Environment Canada, are currently involved in the FCSAP program as custodians of sites. The Contaminated Sites Program responsibilities include hosting the FCSAP Secretariat, developing guidance and program policies, and providing expert support to federal custodians for the assessment and remediation/risk management activities at their sites. In addition, the FCSAP Secretariat coordinates the implementation of the Shared Sites Policy Framework. Under the Contaminated Sites Program, EC also provides technical and scientific advice to the custodial department responsible for the Sydney Tar Ponds project.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Results

Reduced liability at higher-risk federal contaminated sites

Indicators

Reduction in liability at all Class 1 and Class 2 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) funded sites during Phase II of FCSAP

Targets

$1.17 billion FY 2015-16

Reduced risk to the environment and human health from federal contaminated sites

Number of Class 1 and Class 2 Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) funded sites where risk reduction activities have been completed

368 March 2016

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

4.8.1 Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites. (AAFC, AANDC, CSC, DFO, DND, EC, NRC, PC, PWGSC, RCMP, TC)

4.8.2 Guidance and program policies developed by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan program secretariat and the expert support departments are provided to federal custodians for program implementation activities. (DFO, EC, HC, PWGSC)


Implementation Strategies 4.8.1 and 4.8.2 contribute to FSDS Goal 4 – Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians, Target 4.8 – chemicals management.

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.2 – Climate Change and Clean Air

Sub-Program 3.2.1 – Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program

Program Description

This program develops domestic approaches to climate change and air pollution by controlling emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants, and promotes science-based approaches to develop new standards and regulations. Core program activities focus on developing and implementing regulations to achieve the reduction of emissions from the industrial, transportation, and consumer and commercial products sectors while maintaining economic competitiveness. The program also involves analysis related to cross-cutting issues, compliance flexibilities, and equivalency agreements with provinces, as well as consultations with industry, provincial and territorial governments, and other stakeholders. The program works with provinces and territories through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment and is implementing the new Air Quality Management System, which includes establishing new outdoor air quality standards, implementing the industrial emission requirements. The program also works with other jurisdictions, including the U.S., to undertake regional and international efforts to manage transboundary air pollution. The program’s core activities are supported by legal and economic analysis, as well as scientific research, monitoring and modelling on the impacts of air pollution, which provide a basis to develop, implement and evaluate standards and regulations. The program involves data collection, emissions estimation and reporting to support domestic programs and meet international requirements. This includes: the design and implementation of the Single Window Reporting Initiative to provide a single harmonized system to report on GHG and air pollutant emissions; the maintenance of the GHG Emissions Reporting Program to track progress in GHG emission reduction; the estimation of emissions and removals for GHGs and the development, submission, and publication of the annual National GHG Inventory Report and Canada’s Air Pollutant Emissions Inventory; and, the submission of emission data to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe and to the United States to meet commitments under the Ozone Annex and assess general performance reducing air pollutant emissions.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from regulated and/or targeted sectors

Indicators

Canadian industrial emissions of: total particulate matter (TPM);sulphur dioxide (SO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds (VOC), mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3)

Targets

To be determined with the finalization of the regulations

Canadian transportation emissions of: particulate matter (PM10); nitrogen oxides (NOx); and volatile organic compounds (VOC)

Continuous decline of total emissions by March 2015

Canadian emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) in megatonnes (MT) from industrial and mobile sources

To be determined by sector-specific approach to addressing climate change

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

1.1.1: Develop domestic climate change strategies aligned with the U.S. as appropriate for Canadian circumstances as part of Canada’s commitment to meet its national GHG emissions target. (EC)

1.1.14: Undertake modelling, analysis and research, and develop regulatory impact analysis statements in order to support informed federal decision making on policy approaches to reduce GHG emissions and to analyze the economic and competitiveness impacts of policy approaches. (EC)

2.1.13 Undertake and deliver scientific research, monitoring, modelling, testing, data analysis and science advice to inform regulations, policies, programs, science assessments, and services as well as to evaluate effectiveness of actions. (EC, HC)

2.1.16 Undertake modelling, analysis and research, and develop regulatory impact analysis statements in order to support informed federal decision making on policy approaches to reduce air pollutant emissions and to analyze the economic and competitiveness impacts of policy approaches.(EC)


Implementation Strategies 1.1.1 and 1.1.14 contribute to FSDS Goal 1 – climate change, Target 1.1 – climate change mitigation.

Implementation Strategies 2.1.13 and 2.1.16 contribute to FSDS Goal 2 – Air Pollution, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Analysis in support of regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015:
Please refer to ‘Analysis in support of regulations’ under Sub-Program 1.3.2.

Atmospheric research, monitoring and modelling

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $18.16 million

Cross-cutting analysis

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $3.13 million

Greenhouse gas policy

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $4.59 million

Science integration, accountability and benefits of action

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $0.69 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.2 – Climate Change and Clean Air

Sub-Program 3.2.1 – Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.1 – Industrial Sector Emissions

Program Description

This program aims to reduce emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) from industrial sectors. Key activities include the development, implementation and administration of standards, regulations and other risk management instruments to reduce air pollutants in the major industrial sectors and GHG emissions from electricity, oil and gas and emissions-intensive, trade-exposed (EITE) industrial sectors. The program includes the implementation of the new industrial emission standards, which are key elements of federal responsibility within the new Air Quality Management System. Additional activities include monitoring, emission quantification and reporting, verification, research and modelling, as well as economic and scientific assessments of current and future levels of air pollutants and GHG emissions to improve risk management, and support developing standards, regulations and other risk management instruments. The program is also responsible for reporting requirements under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and reporting to meet domestic and international obligations. It includes the design and implementation of the Single Window Reporting Initiative. Furthermore, the program provides information to Canadians and decision makers about the environmental and health impacts associated with air pollutants, which includes scientific monitoring and short-term studies regarding impacts from the oil sands.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Results

Industrial sectors meet emission intensity levels or other emission management requirements for greenhouse gases to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates

Indicators

Percentage of industrial facilities meeting their regulated greenhouse gas emission performance requirement

Targets

To be determined by the regulation

Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates

Percentage of targeted industrial facilities meeting their regulated air pollutant emissions reduction requirement

To be determined by the regulation

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

1.1.13: Undertake and deliver scientific research, risk assessment and regular reporting in support of regulatory and other programs, including data analysis, inventory development, monitoring, modelling and assessment of the effectiveness of efforts as well as research on options, costs and benefits, and technology assessments. (EC)

1.1.15: Provide science information and expertise to inform science assessments and reports related to climate change. (EC)

1.1.16: Continue to implement and expand the single-window reporting initiative for national releases and emissions reporting. (EC)

1.1.17: Continue to develop and implement regulations to reduce GHG emissions from emissions intensive trade exposed (EITE) sectors. (EC)

1.1.18: Continue to develop and implement regulations and other instruments to reduce GHG emissions in the electricity sector. (EC)

1.1.19: Continue to develop regulations to reduce GHG emissions in the oil and gas sectors. (EC)

1.1.56: Develop and submit a complete and compliant annual national GHG Inventory Report and Common Reporting Format tables to the UNFCCC Secretariat by April 15 to meet UNFCCC reporting requirements. (EC)

2.1.12: Track releases of harmful substances under the National Pollutant Release Inventory in accordance with Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (EC)

2.1.14 Characterize the impacts of air pollution on ecosystems and wildlife in order to evaluate the impact of regulations and inform regulatory development. (EC)

2.1.15: Using the National Pollutant Release Inventory and other data sources, prepare and submit Air Pollutant Emission Inventory to meet domestic needs and international reporting requirements. (EC)

2.1.17: Begin to deliver scientific information and advice required to better understand the impacts of the oil sands sector on air quality and deposition of atmospheric contaminants into aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. (EC)

2.1.19: Continue to work collaboratively with provinces, territories and stakeholders to implement the Air Quality Management System, which includes new ambient air quality standards, a framework for managing air quality through local air zones and regional airsheds, and emissions requirements for major industrial sectors and equipment types. (EC, HC)

2.1.25: Continue to develop, implement and administer emission standards to reduce air pollutants in the major industrial sectors and equipment types. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 1.1.13, 1.1.15, 1.1.16, 1.1.17, 1.1.18, 1.1.19 and 1.1.56 contribute to FSDS Goal 1 – climate change, Target 1.1 – climate change mitigation.

Implementation Strategies 2.1.12, 2.1.14, 2.1.15, 2.1.17, 2.1.19, and 2.1.25 contribute to FSDS Goal 2 – air pollution, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Data collection and reporting for atmospheric pollutants

Planned Spending for 2014–2015:
Please refer to ‘Data collection and reporting for atmospheric pollutants’ under Sub-Program 2.1.2.

Atmospheric pollutants policy

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $2.90 million

Atmospheric research, monitoring and modelling

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $18.16 million

Cross-cutting data collection and reporting

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $3.08 million

Data collection and reporting for GHGs

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $7.76 million

Electricity regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $0.37 million

Emissions-intensive trade-exposed (EITE) regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $1.02 million

Oil and gas regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $0.92 million

Oil sands science

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $2.84 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.2 – Climate Change and Clean Air

Sub-Program 3.2.1 – Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.2 – Transportation Sector Emissions

Program Description

This program aims to reduce emissions from transportation sources (vehicles, engines and fuels, including biofuels) through the development, implementation and administration of regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The program’s key activities include development of GHG regulations for light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles; development of air pollutant regulations for various vehicles, engines and fuels, including biofuels; and implementation and administration of those regulations including scientific testing and emissions verification to ensure compliance to the standards. The program also works to address air pollutant and GHG emissions from maritime shipping by working with Transport Canada in developing domestic and international emission standards agreed to at the International Maritime Organization as well as recommended practices for marine vessels. The program implements Canadian regulations and provides targeted research and development.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Results

Reduced greenhouse gas emissions from new motor vehicles, engines and fuels sold in Canada

Indicators

Percentage of companies meeting the fleet average greenhouse gas (GHG) emission requirements for passenger automobiles and light-trucks

Targets

100% by 2015

Reduced air pollutant emissions from new motor vehicles, engines and fuels sold in Canada

Percentage of companies meeting the fleet average nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission requirements for light-duty on road vehicles

100% by December 2014

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

1.1.29 Continue to work with Provincial and Territorial governments through a Mobile Sources Working Group (MSWG) to develop an Action Plan to reduce emissions from the mobile sources sector by sharing information and identifying areas of joint interest among jurisdictions, departments and ministries. (EC)

1.1.33 Develop and implement GHG emission regulations for light-duty vehicles (for model years 2017–2025) and heavy-duty vehicles (for model years 2014–2018) under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which will align with those of the U.S. (EC, TC)

1.1.34 Address GHG emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development. (EC, TC)

2.1.21 Address air pollutant emissions from maritime shipping by working with the International Maritime Organization in the development of new international standards and recommended practices for marine vessels, as well as through the implementation of new Canadian regulations, and targeted research and development. (EC, TC)

2.1.24 Continue to develop, implement and administer emission standards to reduce air pollutants in the transportation sector. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 1.1.29, 1.1.33, and 1.1.34 contribute to FSDS Goal 1 – climate change, Target 1.1 – climate change mitigation.

Implementation Strategies 2.1.21 and 2.1.24 contribute to FSDS Goal 2 – air pollution, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Health and environmental impacts of air pollutants

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $3.23 million

Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $2.04 million

Transportation regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $8.28 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.2 – Climate Change and Clean Air

Sub-Program 3.2.1 – Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory Program
Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.3 – Consumer and Commercial Products Sector

Program Description

This program aims to reduce emissions of air pollutants from consumer and commercial products. This is achieved through the development and administration of regulations and other measures under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999(Part 5–Controlling Toxic Substances). The program provides strategic planning to guide action in other consumer and commercial product sectors for the next phase of regulatory and non-regulatory measures.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Reduced emissions of volatile organic compounds from regulated consumer and commercial products

Indicator

Percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction from the architectural coatings sector

Target

28% by 2014

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

2.1.23 Target control measures on volatile organic compounds in some consumer and commercial products. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 2.1.23 contributes to FSDS Goal 2 – air pollution, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Consumer and commercial products regulations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $0.28 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.2 – Climate Change and Clean Air

Sub-Program 3.2.2 – International Climate Change and Clean Air Partnership

Program Description

This program leads the development and implementation of bilateral and international agreements to address air pollutants and global greenhouse gas emissions, and coordinates Canada’s policy, negotiating positions and participation in relevant international fora. The program represents Canada at the North American Leaders’ Summit; leads and participates in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process and complementary international processes to negotiate a comprehensive, binding international climate change agreement; and advances Canada’s negotiating positions and objectives in international fora, such as: the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to reduce Short Lived Climate Pollutants, the Arctic Council, Global Methane Initiative and Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. The program meets international obligations by contributing to organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Inter American Institute for Global Change. The program also works with the U.S. under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA), to undertake regional and international efforts to manage transboundary air pollution. The program also works to implement the U.S.–Canada Clean Energy Dialogue, to support bilateral collaboration on clean energy priorities, as well as with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to address common issues related to climate change and air quality. It also participates in the ongoing negotiations and implementation of the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Using the National Pollutant Release Inventory, the program prepares and submits the Air Pollutant Emission Inventory to meet domestic needs and international reporting requirements. As well, it coordinates Canada’s participation under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and its Multilateral Fund, with a view to ensuring the gradual elimination of ozone-depleting substances at a global level. Participation under the Montreal Protocol includes promoting a North American proposal to phase-down consumption and production of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), in a manner complementary to provisions on HFCs under the UNFCCC. Participation in the Multilateral Fund includes ensuring payment of Canada’s assessed contribution to the Fund and of the costs of hosting its Secretariat in Montreal (paid through the grants for implementation of the Montreal Protocol). The program supports, in cooperation with other departments and in alignment with international programs, domestic priorities regarding climate change.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

International negotiations and agreements on air pollutants and greenhouse gases are proceeding in a direction consistent with Canadian priorities and interests

Indicator

Percentage of stated objectives to be achieved in international negotiations and/or agreements which were met or mostly met

Target

Negotiations: 70%
Agreements: 70%
By March 2015

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

1.1.49: Lead Government of Canada participation in international negotiations at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on climate change for a post-2020 climate change agreement. (EC)

1.1.50: Work to implement Canada's commitments concluded in international climate change negotiations such as mitigation targets and actions; short-and long-term financing; mechanisms for technology and reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation; adaptation actions; and provisions for transparency and accountability of climate change actions. (EC, NRCan)

1.1.52: Support Canada’s participation in multilateral fora outside of the UNFCCC and ensure that Canada's international climate change objectives are advanced in international meetings including addressing short-lived climate pollutants (e.g. Climate and Clean Air Coalition, Global Methane Initiative and Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, Major Economies Forum and Arctic Council). (AAFC, EC)

1.1.53: Ensure that Canada’s international climate change objectives related to energy and clean technology are advanced in international meetings (e.g. Canada-U.S. Clean Energy Dialogue, UNFCCC, Clean Energy Ministerial). (EC, NRCan)

1.1.54: Contribute to the overall functioning of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research and their ongoing work to produce policy-relevant scientific information on climate change. (EC)

1.1.55: Work with the U.S. and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to address common issues related to climate change and air quality. (EC)

2.1.20: Work with other jurisdictions, including the U.S. under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA) to undertake regional and international efforts to manage transboundary air pollution of concern for Canadians and their environment. This includes work towards the completion of the necessary scientific, technical and regulatory foundations required for the consideration of a Particulate Matter Annex under the AQA. (EC, HC)

2.1.28: Continue to promote a North American proposal to phase-down emissions of hydrofluorocarbons under the Montreal Protocol and develop complementary domestic regulations where appropriate. (EC)

2.1.30: Revise domestic ozone-depleting substances regulations in support of the Montreal Protocol commitment to accelerate the phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 1.1.49, 1.1.50, 1.1.52, 1.1.53, 1.1.54 and 1.1.55 contribute to FSDS Goal 1 – climate change, Target 1.1 – climate change mitigation.

Implementation Strategies 2.1.20, 2.1.28 and 2.1.30 contribute to FSDS Goal 2 – air pollution, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Atmospheric pollutants policy

Planned Spending for 2014–2015:

Please refer to ‘Atmospheric pollutants policy’ under Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.1.1.

Engagement and alignment with United States

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $0.85 million

International climate change participation and negotiations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $4.53 million

International climate obligations

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $0.34 million

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.2 – Climate Change and Clean Air

Sub-Program 3.2.3 – Environmental Technology

Program Description

This program delivers expert environmental science and technology analysis and assessment, and program management to support the Government of Canada’s clean air and greenhouse gas (GHG) technology investment decisions, policy-making and regulations. It oversees the operations of Sustainable Development Technology Canada with Natural Resources Canada and a range of other science and technology programs related to clean technology. It provides expert analysis and assessment to advance clean technologies to help ensure that government priorities regarding clean air, climate change mitigation and green infrastructure are addressed.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Reduced emissions from the implementation of new environmental technologies

Indicators

Annual reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide equivalents) resulting from environmental technologies supported

Targets

7.1 MT by 2015

Annual reduction of emissions of air pollutants (criteria air contaminants) resulting from environmental technologies supported

.0221 MT by 2025

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

1.1.2: Provide analysis and assessments of the environmental performance of new and emerging technologies, and contribute to the oversight of programs, such as Sustainable Development Technology Canada, that advance clean technologies. (EC)

2.1.9: Provide analysis and assessments of the environmental performance of new and emerging technologies, and contribute to the oversight of programs, such as Sustainable Development Technology Canada, that advance clean technologies. (EC)


Implementation Strategy 1.1.2 contributes to FSDS Goal 1 – climate change, Target 1.1 – climate change mitigation.

Implementation Strategy 2.1.9 contributes to FSDS Goal 2 – air pollutants, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

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EC Strategic Outcome 3

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Program 3.3 – Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution

Program Description

This program contributes to minimizing damage and threats to the natural environment and biodiversity through the promotion and enforcement of legislation administered by Environment Canada. Activities focus on pollution including toxic substances, their release to air, water or land, and the import and export of hazardous waste that presents a risk to the environment and/or human health. The program maintains a contingent of compliance promotion and enforcement officers. Compliance promotion officers deliver activities to increase regulatees’ awareness, understanding and compliance with regulations and other risk management instruments under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and the Fisheries Act. The goal is to increase the effectiveness in achieving desired environmental results. The officers also provide information on risk management instrument requirements, the benefits of compliance and the potential penalties of non-compliance, when applicable. Enforcement officers gather intelligence, conduct inspections to verify compliance with laws and regulations, and pursue investigations to take appropriate enforcement measures against offenders. The program works with the U.S. and Mexico through the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen transboundary environmental enforcement. The program also includes officer training, information management systems for new regulations and administration, and is informed by scientific analyses and expertise, including science advice to support compliance promotion and enforcement actions.

Performance Measurement Framework

Expected Result

Compliance with pollution laws and regulations administered by Environment Canada

Indicator

Compliance with regulatory requirements for selected regulations

Target

10% increase in compliance relative to the baseline

Dry Cleaning Regulations: 2015-16
Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations: 2016-17
Metal Mining Effluent Regulations: 2017-18

2013-16 FSDS Implementation Strategies:

2.1.10: Work with the U.S. and Mexico under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation to strengthen environmental enforcement. (EC)

2.1.29: Deliver compliance promotion activities for key regulatory initiatives. (EC)

4.8.10: Deliver compliance promotion activities for key regulatory initiatives. (EC)


Implementation Strategies 2.1.10 and 2.1.29 contribute to FSDS Goal 2 – air pollutants, Target 2.1 – outdoor air pollutants.

Implementation Strategy 4.8.10 contributes to FSDS Goal 4 – conserving and restoring ecosystems, wildlife and habitat, and protecting Canadians, Target 4.8 – chemicals management

Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Financial Resources:

Compliance promotion and enforcement

Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $6.67 million

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Section 6: Greening Government Operations Supplementary Table

Environment Canada is a participant in the FSDS and contributes to the Greening Government Operations (GGO) targets through the Internal Services Program. For additional details on Environment Canada’s GGO activities, please see the GGO supplementary table.

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