Skip booklet index and go to page content

Departmental Performance Report 2012-2013

Section I: Organization Overview


Raison d’être

Environment Canada is the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental issues affecting Canadians. The Department also plays a stewardship role in achieving and maintaining a clean, safe and sustainable environment. A science-based department, Environment Canada addresses issues through monitoring, research, policy development, service delivery to Canadians, regulations, enforcement of environmental laws, advancement of clean technologies and strategic partnerships. The Department’s programs focus on a clean environment by minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; a safe environment by equipping Canadians to make informed decisions on weather, water and climate conditions; and a sustainable environment by conserving and restoring Canada’s natural environment. The Department’s program focus reflects the increasingly evident interdependence between environmental sustainability and economic well-being.

Responsibilities

A number of acts and regulations provide the Department with its mandate and allow it to carry out its programs. Under the Department of the Environment Act, the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of the Environment extend to and include matters relating to

  • the preservation and enhancement of the quality of the natural environment, including water, air and soil quality, and the coordination of the relevant policies and programs of the Government of Canada;
  • renewable resources, including migratory birds and other non-domestic flora and fauna;
  • water;
  • meteorology; and
  • the enforcement of any rules or regulations such as those made by the International Joint Commission relating to boundary waters.

Beyond those authorities conferred under the Department of the Environment Act, the Minister of the Environment exercises additional authorities provided under other acts and regulations including (but not limited to) the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Federal Sustainable Development Act, and several pieces of legislation relating to the protection of biodiversity and water and the enforcement of environmental laws and regulations (e.g. the Species at Risk Act). Under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, Environment Canada provides information and analysis to others (as a federal authority) to support robust environmental assessments.

The Department is a key partner to other federal departments (including its ministerial portfolio partners, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and Parks Canada), where statutes provide Environment Canada with secondary or shared responsibility for the successful execution of other federal departments’ mandates. These statutes include, among others, the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act (Transport Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Natural Resources Canada), the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology Act (Natural Resources Canada), the Fisheries Act (Fisheries and Oceans Canada) and the Marine Liability Act (Transport Canada).

Environment Canada has a long history. The Department was created in 1971, but some of its component organizations are much older, such as the Canadian Wildlife Service founded in 1947, the Water Survey of Canada in 1908, and the Meteorological Service of Canada in 1871.

Environment Canada has a national workforce. About 60% of our workforce is located outside the National Capital Region. Department employees are located across Canada, from Iqaluit to Burlington and Vancouver to St. John’s, working in field offices, laboratories, National Wildlife Areas and weather stations.

Environment Canada is a science-based department. The Department devotes significant budget and workforce resources to science and technology activities in diverse fields, including biology, chemistry, atmospheric and environmental sciences, hydrology, meteorology, engineering, and informatics. Science and technology form the foundation of the Department’s work; they are central to Environment Canada’s capacity to achieve its mandate and meet its legislative obligations. The Department collects and disseminates knowledge to support sound environmental decision making and encourages innovation in science and technology.

Environment Canada works collaboratively with many partners. Environmental issues have wide-ranging implications for social and economic decisions. Environment Canada works in collaboration with many partners, including other federal government departments, provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal governments, the governments of other nations, academic institutions, environmental non-governmental organizations, and international organizations. This collaboration enhances the efforts of all partners in working for a clean, safe and sustainable environment.

Environment Canada is committed to operating as a world-class regulator. As an important federal regulator, Environment Canada works within the broader federal performance-based regulatory system developing, promoting compliance with and enforcing a wide array of regulations to protect Canadians and their environment. Environment Canada is committed to having a regulatory system that is evidence-based, effective, efficient, transparent and adaptable.

Top of Section


Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

Environment Canada fulfills its mandate by promoting three Strategic Outcomes, each contributing to the Government of Canada outcome of a clean and healthy environment.

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.
This Strategic Outcome is aimed at ensuring that land, water and biodiversity are sustained so that Canadians can enjoy and benefit from their natural legacy over the long term.

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.
Canadians need to have information and services to enable them to respond and adapt to immediate and longer-term changes in weather, water, air quality and climate conditions that affect their health, safety and economic well-being.

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
This Strategic Outcome addresses the management and reduction of pollution and waste that directly or indirectly harms human health or the environment.

Program Alignment Architecture

There are 9 Programs and 25 Sub-Programs that are aligned to support the achievement of the Department’s 3 Strategic Outcomes. Together, the Programs, Sub-Programs and Strategic Outcomes support progress against the Department’s stewardship mandate of providing a clean, safe and sustainable environment. In addition to conducting these Programs, Environment Canada maintains core internal corporate services.

All of the Department’s Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Sub-Programs and Internal Services are illustrated within Environment Canada’s 2012–2013 Program Alignment Architecture shown below.

All of the Department's Strategic Outcomes, Program Activities and Internal Services Activities

View text version

Top of Section


Organizational Priorities 2012–2013

Environment Canada delivered successfully on its priorities during 2012–2013. Examples of progress achieved are set out below.

A Clean Environment: Manage substances and waste, and reduce pollution that directly or indirectly harms human health or the environment.

Type: Ongoing (Restated)

Links to Strategic Outcome 3:
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Links to Programs:
3.1 Substances and Waste Management
3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air
3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement–Pollution and
1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement–Wildlife

Progress Achieved:

Greenhouse gas emissions

  • Published final regulations to limit greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from coal-fired electricity generation and from new on-road heavy-duty vehicles (2014 and later model years).
  • Developed and published proposed regulations to set more stringent GHG emissions standards for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017 and beyond – aligned with U.S. standards.
  • Continued to advance sector-by-sector regulatory work to reduce GHGs.

Air Quality Management System

  • Achieved agreement among federal, provincial and territorial ministers to move forward on implementing the new Air Quality Management System (AQMS) in collaboration with the provinces and territories. Under the AQMS, the federal government is responsible for developing/publishing Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) and implementing the base-level industrial emission requirements (BLIERs) requirements under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999
  • Finalized new CAAQS for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone and published them in the Canada Gazette, Part 1, on May 25, 2013.
  • Completed pre-regulatory development and consultations for the first phase of regulated BLIERs for the cement sector and for non-utility industrial boilers and heaters and natural gas-fired reciprocating engines.

Collaborative efforts on climate change and air quality

  • Concluded work under the Arctic Council Task Force on Short-Lived Climate Forcers (also referred to as short-lived climate pollutants or SLCPs), including the development of recommendations for mitigation of SLCPs. The final report was endorsed by Arctic ministers in May 2013.
  • Continued Canada’s active participation (as founding member and lead partner) in the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to reduce SLCPs. Canada contributed $13 million to support the Coalition and another $7 million for bilateral projects that support long-term mitigation of SLCPs in developing countries.
  • Represented Canada at negotiations to finalize and adopt revisions to the 1999 Protocol to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-level Ozone (the Gothenburg Protocol) under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution. This work will allow for Canada’s possible future ratification of the Protocol.
  • Represented Canada at negotiations, under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme, to finalize the text of a global, legally binding agreement to prevent mercury emissions and releases (treaty to be known as the Minamata Convention on Mercury). 
  • Delivered contributions of over $49 million in climate change support to developing countries under the fast start financing program.
  • Through the Canada–United States Air Quality Agreement, continued to cooperate with the United States to reduce the transboundary movement of air pollutants, particularly those that cause acid rain and smog.
  • Continued air quality monitoring and related science across Canada, including in support of the AQMS and under the Joint Canada–Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring.
  • Published reports and papers, in peer-reviewed scientific literature, covering topics related to smog, acid deposition and mercury, as well as reports and papers on understanding the impacts on air quality of pollutants from sources such as the transportation and fuel sectors.

Existing and new substances

  • Carried out targeted action on substances under the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), ranging from putting in place pollution prevention planning requirements for substances (including Bisphenol A and Isoprene) to prohibiting the use, sale and import of substances such as Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, Reaction Products with Styrene and 2,4,4-Trimethylpentene (BNST), an additive used in vehicle engine oil.  

Wastewater

  • Published final regulations to reduce the release of harmful substances in effluent from wastewater systems, thereby addressing one of the largest sources of pollution in Canadian waters.
  • Established a national electronic regulatory reporting system and advanced negotiations of bilateral agreements with provinces and Yukon.

Promoting compliance and enforcement–pollution and wildlife

  • Completed over 16,000 inspections on regulations under 6 acts, including the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Fisheries Act, and the Species at Risk Act. Also completed almost 60,000 compliance promotion activities, including reaching 100% of those known to be subject to many risk management instruments under the CMP.
  • Continued reporting on compliance promotion and enforcement activities in accordance with a number of acts.

A Safe Environment: Provide Canadians with relevant information on immediate and long-term environmental conditions.

Type: Ongoing (Restated)

Links to Strategic Outcome 2:
Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Links to Programs:
2.1 Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
2.2 Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users

Progress Achieved:

Deliver first-rate weather and environmental services for Canadians and targeted users

  • Successfully and appropriately provided Canadians with ongoing weather forecasts and warnings of severe weather events (such as Hurricane Sandy).
  • Made innovative use of social media and other Internet-based applications (e.g. Google Alert) to provide Canadians with needed information–including severe weather alerts–in a timely manner.
  • Continued to implement business transformation projects including the re-engineering of the weather warning and service delivery system, and the development and implementation of the next generation of weather prediction systems.
  • Delivered critical weather services (24/7) to meet the needs of targeted users.
  • Took action to maintain a knowledgeable, sustainable workforce and a healthy workplace, including actions to develop, recruit and retain the skills and expertise needed to deliver weather and environmental services.
  • Provided science support to initiatives in Canada and internationally, including in support of climate change (e.g. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Arctic Council), and the establishment of the Global Framework for Climate Services within the World Meteorological Organization.

Important improvements to infrastructure

  • Began implementing the $78.7 million federal government investment allocated in Budget 2011 to strengthen weather monitoring infrastructure, including upgrades to 22 surface weather stations, the Canadian Weather Radar Network, the Canadian Weather and Climate Observing Networks, and the Canadian Lightning Detection Network.
  • Made progress on the Arctic METAREAsFootnote 1 project with the expansion of forecast coverage, the installation of surface weather stations in the Arctic and the deployment of buoys (in partnership with the Department of National Defence).
  • Partnered with Shared Services Canada (SSC) to replace the Department’s high-performance computer in Dorval, Quebec. The supercomputing capacity supports improved weather models for forecasts and early warnings to Canadians and targeted users, and facilitates the transfer of weather, climate and air quality research to operations.

A Sustainable Environment: Ensure that land, water and biodiversity are sustained.

Type: Ongoing (Restated)

Links to Strategic Outcome 1:
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Links to Programs:
1.1 Biodiversity–Wildlife and Habitat
1.2 Water Resources
1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems
1.4 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement–Wildlife (reported on under 3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement–Pollution)

Progress Achieved:

Biodiversity

  • Continued to implement the Species at Risk Act, including posting to the Species at Risk Public Registry a final recovery strategy for the Woodland Caribou, Boreal population (boreal caribou), and recovery documents for other species.
  • Released a major scientific report on birds in Canada in partnership with a non-governmental organization, finalized and made public 8 bird conservation plans, drafted 14 management plans for National Wildlife Areas, and initiated a pilot project for grassland birds through a joint venture.
  • Continued active participation in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES)–including on the issue of commercial trade in polar bear.
  • Progressed with securing habitats important to species at risk. For example, as of 2012–2013, 173,668 hectares of habitat, equivalent to one third the size of Prince Edward Island, had been secured in Canada through the Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk, benefiting up to 404 species assessed as at risk by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.
  • Continued to develop the National Conservation Plan by engaging a range of stakeholders and drawing on the results of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development’s recent conservation-related studies.
  • Moved forward with research, modelling and other science that supports biodiversity goals and priorities.

Water

  • Successfully negotiated amendments to the Canada–United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement–the first since the Agreement was last revised in 1987.
  • Closely monitored water levels in the Great Lakes and the Arctic, and supported provinces and territories with data on water levels and flood forecasts.
  • Delivered water quality and quantity monitoring and related science across Canada, including under the Joint Canada–Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring.
  • Worked with other federal departments to increase water sampling in shellfish harvesting areas.
  • Initiated development of a risk-based approach to water quality monitoring.
  • Continued investment in new field technologies in all regions of Canada–with emphasis on new hydroacoustic equipment that supports real-time level and flow estimations in extreme events such as floods.

Sustainability

  • Invested in ecosystems across the country (including the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence, Lake Winnipeg, Lake Simcoe and Atlantic), and continued to deliver on the Action Plan for Clean Water through delivery of sediment management projects.
  • Continued to collaborate with the Government of Alberta and stakeholders to implement, over three years, an industry-funded integrated approach to monitoring, evaluating and reporting on the significance of environmental contaminant pathways in air and water, the biological effects of such contaminants, and the impacts of habitat disturbance as described in the Joint Canada–Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring.
  • Tabled in Parliament the second Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (2010–2013) Progress Report and released the draft 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for public consultation.
  • Continued to develop and apply models for economic, social and ecological valuation of ecosystem services to support sustainable development decision making.
  • Added 15 new indicators and updated 21 indicators of environmental sustainability, as part of the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators initiative. Provided science-based information for reporting on water quality indicators using data from over 300 sites and maintained quality assurance and control.

Management Priority: Enabling Transition and Alignment – Activities and resources are aligned to best support delivery of programs and services in a period of fiscal restraint.

Type: Ongoing (Restated)

Links to Strategic Outcomes 1, 2 and 3

Links to All Programs

Progress Achieved:

  • Completed a pilot project for Environment Canada’s contribution to the federal government’s Open Data Portal (launched in June 2013).
  • Worked with the Government of Alberta to finalize and launch the Canada–Alberta Oil Sands Environmental Monitoring Information Portal to provide the public with access to the extensive results of monitoring of air, water, land and biodiversity in the oil sands.
  • Completed implementation of new service delivery models for human resources and financial services. Work involved several major initiatives to improve the efficiency, effectiveness and accountability for human resources and financial services functions within the Department. 
  • Implemented a new periodic process to monitor the progress of programs in response to the recommendations of past audit and evaluation reports in previous periods.
  • Signed working arrangements with Shared Services Canada (SSC) to establish relationships and accountabilities between Environment Canada and SSC, and to ensure the ongoing support of the Department’s mission-critical services, including laying the groundwork for the acquisition and set-up of a new supercomputer needed to support the Department’s work.
  • Advanced government policy priorities with Canadian and international partners, including in support of the Global Commerce Strategy, the work of the Arctic Council and bilateral relations with other countries.
  • Implemented a new grants and contributions planning process to improve timeliness of funding decisions and better alignment of resources to priority initiatives and programs.
  • Completed a revision of the Departmental Business Continuity Plan and further developed regional and site-level plans.
  • Introduced performance measurement of security services and delivered security-related awareness briefings to 92% of departmental employees (including classroom and online activities).
  • Improved communication strategies, products and innovative tools to support both internal and external communication requirements.

Top of Section


Environment Canada’s Five Key Environmental Indicators

Environment Canada's programs are focused on delivering a clean, safe and sustainable environment for Canadians. Five key environmental indicators were developed to represent, at a high level, progress in these three areas.

The results of these indicators are not solely attributable to Environment Canada's actions, but are indicative of the results achieved collectively by various levels of government and partners, in accordance with their responsibilities for the environment.

Environment Canada develops and communicates these and other national environmental indicators through the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) initiative. Further details are available on the CESI website. These indicators are also reported as part of Environment Canada's Performance Measurement Framework (PMF).

Environmental Indicators

Stewardship Mandate: CLEAN
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Key IndicatorsResults
Air Quality
Ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5)Footnote 2

Target: Below the 24-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard of 28 µg/m3 for 2015
The national annual peak (98th percentile) 24-hour concentration of PM2.5 has been steady since 2000. In 2011, the value was 22.1 micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3), which remains below the 24-hour Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standard of 28 µg/m3 for 2015.
Climate Change
GHG emissions

Copenhagen
Target: 17% below 2005 level by 2020
Canada’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2011 were 702 megatonnes (Mt) of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq), or 5% (35 Mt) below the 2005 emissions of 737 Mt.

Stewardship Mandate: SAFE
Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Key IndicatorsResults
Severe Weather Events
Weather Warning Index

Target: 7.6 by 2015
The Weather Warning Index was 7.9 (using data from 2010 to 2012), an improvement on last year’s score of 7.5 (using data from 2009 to 2011). The index is on a scale of 0 to 10, where 10 signifies that all warnings were within target lead times and that there were no missed events or false alarms.

Stewardship Mandate: SUSTAINABLE
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Key IndicatorsResults
Biodiversity
Protected areas

Target: 17% of Canada's terrestrial area by 2020Footnote 3
In 2012, 10% (1,003,818 km2) of Canada's land and freshwater (terrestrial) area and approximately 0.7% (49,326 km2) of its marine territory have been recognized as protected; this is roughly the size of the province of British Columbia.
Water Quality
National Freshwater Quality Indicator

Target: 50% of core national monitoring sites rated as excellent or good by 2015Footnote 4
Overall, the National Freshwater Quality Indicator remained stable between 2003 and 2010. For the period 2008 to 2010, freshwater quality was rated as excellent or good at 44% of stations, fair at 39%, marginal at 16% and poor at 1%.

Top of Section


Risk Analysis

This section describes the Department’s corporate risks as identified in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP), summarizes Environment Canada's response to these corporate risks, and provides the relevant links to the Departmental Program Alignment Architecture and organizational priorities. The mitigation measures that respond to these risks are aimed at minimizing the threats these risks may have posed to the Department’s capacity to deliver on its mandate and to meet its operational and management priorities.

RiskRisk Response StrategyLink to Program Alignment ArchitectureLink to Organizational Priorities
Transition: Risks related to fiscal restraint
  • The Department made rapid progress in implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures and continues to align resources to priorities. The majority of measures to return to fiscal balance have been applied. As a result, the transition risk is no longer considered a key corporate risk.
  • All Strategic Outcomes and Program 4.1 (Internal Services)
  • All priorities as listed above
Engagement: Risks related to partnerships and key stakeholder engagement
  • The Department is realizing benefits of using innovative solutions; consultations and meetings are taking place via technology (i.e. webinars).
  • The sector approach to key regulatory initiatives enhances knowledge of sectors and working relationships with key domestic and international partners and stakeholders, such as new federal/provincial/territorial working groups being established to address adaptation and data/analysis aspects of climate change.
  • Creation of Environment Canada–Shared Services Canada Liaison Office to ensure that the Department’s interests are maintained.Footnote 5
  • All Strategic Outcomes and Program 4.1 (Internal Services)
  • All priorities as listed above
Business Continuity: Risks related to continuity of critical services
  • Critical services within the 0–4 hour maximum allowable downtime period have been identified throughout the Department.
  • Business continuity plans have been established for critical and higher-risk departmental sites.
  • The Department will continue to collaborate with other federal departments to develop federal emergency management plans.
  • All Strategic Outcomes and Program 4.1 (Internal Services)
  • All priorities as listed above
Skills: Risks related to a sustainable and knowledgeable workforce
  • Human resources plans are updated on a yearly basis and include succession planning, work-life balance and training.
  • Innovative approaches are being taken across the Department to help retain, retrain and motivate staff.
  • The Department is implementing its action plan to respond to the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey.
  • There has been extensive Deputy Minister and senior management engagement in the development and implementation of people management strategies in the context of business transformation, renewal and workforce adjustment.
  • All Strategic Outcomes and Program 4.1 (Internal Services)
  • All priorities as listed above

Risk Narrative

Environment Canada’s objectives and Strategic Outcomes, along with the risks the Department faces, are influenced by the environment in which it operates. For the risks included in the 2011–2013 Corporate Risk Profile and 2012–2013 RPP, key risk considerations external to the Department were as follows:

  • increasing Canadian and international expectations concerning the management of the environment
  • the continuously increasing pace of advances in science and technology
  • a shift to centralized service delivery (e.g. SSC)

Risk management thus continues to be a key activity for the Department that supports and informs departmental priority setting, business and resource planning, and decision making.

Top of Section


Summary of Performance

Financial Resources ($ millions)*
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending
2012–2013
Difference
Planned vs. Actual Spending
*Throughout this document, totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
972.7997.61,116.8989.77.9

The Department's planned spending represents the amount approved by Parliament through the Main Estimates and adjusted by other anticipated adjustments for the remainder of the year. Throughout the year, new and renewed funding added $119.2 million to planned spending, increasing total authorities to $1,116.8 million. The main items contributing to the increase were additional fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord ($21.1 million), a statutory payment to the Nature Conservancy of Canada ($24 million), the Species at Risk Program ($12.5 million) and funding provided via Treasury Board (TB) central votes (e.g. severance payments, maternity leave).  

The actual spending of $989.7 million (89% of total authorities) was slightly lower than planned spending and reflects the departmental expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts.

Actual spending has decreased over the last few years due to the sunsetting of the National Vehicle Scrappage Program, the Economic Action Plan 2009, the transfer of responsibilities to Shared Services Canada and the implementation of new streamlining and efficiency measures. Planned spending decreases in future years are due to ongoing implementation of new efficiencies and the sunsetting or reductions in required funding for initiatives including the Nature Conservancy of Canada, the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda and fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord. A planned statutory payment to Sustainable Development Technology Canada creates a one-time increase in planned spending in 2014–2015.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent–FTE)*
Planned
2012–2013
Actual
2012–2013
Difference
2012–2013
*Throughout this document, totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures. The actual FTE number includes students.
6,2376,284(47)

The human resources required to sustain an average level of employment for one full-time equivalent (FTE) over 12 months is based on a 37.5-hour work week. Environment Canada used 6,284 FTEs in 2012–2013, a slight increase of 47 FTEs (0.8%) over planned FTEs of 6,237. Planned FTEs and actual FTEs should be read in relation to planned spending and actual spending, respectively, in the above 2012–2013 Financial Resources table.

Performance Summary Tables ($ millions)

Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.
ProgramTotal Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013)Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2011–2012
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2010–2011
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Biodiversity–Wildlife and Habitat88.388.399.896.9129.6124.3138.8129.3A Clean and Healthy Environment
Water Resources95.995.996.898.7109.5108.6107.6118.0A Clean and Healthy Environment
Sustainable Ecosystems61.661.671.675.970.267.566.265.8A Clean and Healthy Environment
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement–Wildlife17.217.216.816.417.916.717.516.9A Clean and Healthy Environment
Sub-total263.1263.1285.0287.9327.2317.0330.1330.0A Clean and Healthy Environment

Actual spending in 2012–2013 was higher than planned spending for 2012–2013 mainly due to funding received for the Nature Conservancy of Canada, the renewal of the Species at Risk Program and the Great Lakes Nutrient Initiative. Actual spending decreased in 2012–2013 in comparison with 2011–2012 spending due to a reduced funding requirement for the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.
ProgramTotal Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013)Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2011–2012
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2010–2011
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians191.3191.3153.5159.1177.2167.7172.4186.8A Clean and Healthy Environment
Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users25.832.325.525.526.723.024.123.0A Clean and Healthy Environment
Sub-total217.0223.5179.1184.6203.9190.7196.5209.9A Clean and Healthy Environment

Actual spending in 2012–2013 was lower than planned spending for 2012–2013 mainly due to the realignment between Programs for the transfer of funds and responsibilities to Shared Services Canada. The transfer to Shared Services Canada has also resulted in declining actual spending from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013. The increase in planned spending for 2012–2013 was due to funding received for fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord.

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
ProgramTotal Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013)Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2011–2012
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2010–2011
Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
Substances and Waste Management81.781.774.668.587.779.383.3103.7A Clean and Healthy Environment
Climate Change and Clean Air193.2211.5179.5229.9240.2157.5118.3160.8A Clean and Healthy Environment
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement–Pollution45.545.544.042.347.341.743.339.9A Clean and Healthy Environment
Sub-total320.4338.7298.1340.7375.2278.5244.8304.5A Clean and Healthy Environment

Actual spending in 2012–2013 was lower than planned spending for 2012–2013 mainly due to unspent funding for Sustainable Development Technology Canada. Planned spending is reduced in 2013–2014 as funding for Sustainable Development Technology Canada decreases. Further contributing to a decrease in planned spending in 2013–2014 is the sunsetting of funding for fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord and decreases in year-over-year funding for the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda in 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. Planned spending increases in 2014–2015 are due to a planned statutory payment for Sustainable Development Technology Canada. Actual spending was mainly higher in 2010–2011 due to the National Vehicle Scrappage Program and increased in 2012–2013 due to fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord.

Internal Services
Internal ServicesTotal Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013)Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2011–2012
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2010–2011
*Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.
 172.2172.2189.4177.9210.5203.4237.1242.7
Sub-total172.2172.2189.4177.9210.5203.4237.1242.7

Actual spending for 2012–2013 is higher than planned spending for 2012–2013 due to internal realignments of funding to account for the transfer of responsibilities to Shared Services Canada. Actual spending decreased in 2012–2013 compared to 2011–2012 due to reduced expenditures financed through Treasury Board central votes as well as to the transfer of responsibilities to Shared Services Canada.

Total Performance Summary Table ($ millions)
Strategic Outcomes
and
Internal Services
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–2013)Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2012–2013
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2011–2012
Actual Spending* (authorities used)
2010–2011
*2010–2011 total actual spending included $1.8 million from the Mackenzie Gas Project.
Total972.7997.6951.6991.11,116.8989.71,008.51,088.9

Top of Section


Expenditure Profile

The following chart depicts the Department’s spending trend over a seven-year period. For the period from 2009–2010 to 2012–2013, actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For the period 2013–2014 to 2015–2016, the planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the departmental Strategic Outcomes and the implementation of new streamlining and efficiency measures.

Graph showing Environment Canada's spending trend from 2009-2010 to 2015-2016

View text version

Note: Planned spending values in Spending Trend are as reflected in the 2013–2014 Report on Plans and Priorities.

As indicated in the chart above, Environment Canada’s actual spending as per the Public Accounts for 2012–2013 was $989.7 million, a year-over-year decrease of $18.8 million (1.9%) from 2011–2012 spending. This decrease is mainly due to reductions attributable to implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures, a smaller payment to the Nature Conservancy of Canada, and the transfer for a full year of funding and responsibilities to Shared Services Canada. These reductions were offset by increased spending to support fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord.

The decrease in actual spending between 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 is primarily attributed to a reduced payment to the Nature Conservancy of Canada. For the most part, other variations in spending–both increases and decreases–offset each other.

The decrease in actual spending between 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 is mainly due to the transfer of responsibilities to Shared Services Canada as of November 15, 2011, and the sunsetting of funding provided for the National Vehicle Scrappage Program and the Economic Action Plan 2009.

The decrease in planned spending from 2013–2014 to 2015–2016 is the result of implementing new streamlining and efficiency measures as well as sunsetting or reductions in funding for a number of initiatives, including for Sustainable Development Technology Canada, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, the Species at Risk Program and the implementation of Canada’s fast start financing under the Copenhagen Accord. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend or enhance funding. The outcomes of these decisions will therefore be reflected in both the Department’s future budget exercises and Estimates documents.

Top of Section


Estimates by Vote

For information on Environment Canada’s organizational Votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

Top of Section


Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. Environment Canada ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. The Department contributes to the following FSDS 2010–2013 themes (each denoted by a visual identifier) in all three Strategic Outcomes below.

Strategic Outcome 1: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Theme 2: Maintaining Water Quality and AvailabilityTheme 3: Protecting Nature

Strategic Outcome 2: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Theme 1: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Strategic Outcome 3: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Theme 1: Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityTheme 2: Maintaining Water Quality and AvailabilityTheme 3: Protecting Nature

During 2012–2013, Environment Canada considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. Through the strategic environmental assessment process, departmental initiatives were found to have environmental effects on the 2010–2013 FSDS goals and targets in Theme 1–Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Theme 2–Maintaining Water Quality and Availability.

For additional details on Environment Canada’s activities to support sustainable development and strategic environmental assessments, please see Section II of this Departmental Performance Report and the departmental website. For complete information on the FSDS, please visit the Environment Canada website.

Top of Section

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Meteorological areas

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Revised to reflect the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards announced in October 2012 by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity set an aspirational target in October 2010, which was to set aside 17% of land and inland water and at least 10% of coastal and marine areas, by 2020. Canada, as a signatory to the Convention, is contributing to this global target. A specific domestic target for Canada is being developed through consultation with provinces, territories and stakeholders, in recognition of this being a Canada-wide rather than federal government target.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Based on the 2010-2012 data set.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

The Shared Services Canada (SSC) Liaison Office was created to ensure that the Department’s interests are maintained. This is accomplished by

  • facilitating communication between the Department and SSC;
  • participating in the establishment and revision of information technology service-related processes and activities between the Department and SSC;
  • engaging SSC in priority setting where pertinent to SSC–Environment Canada operations and services; and
  • negotiating agreements and working relationships to ensure clear accountabilities.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Date modified: