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2013–2014 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Clean Air Agenda Programming

2013–2014 PAA ProgramsClean Air Agenda ProgramsExpected Achievements
Clean Air Agenda Theme: Adaptation
2.1.3 Climate Information, Predictions and ToolsClimate change prediction and scenarios

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $5.78 million
For 2013–2014, the focus will be on generating and disseminating new knowledge and data on climate change and variability by developing computer models and climate scenarios that help predict seasonal and longer-term climate variations; understanding trends and extremes in temperature and precipitation; and continued improvements in cryosphere (snow and ice) and land surface processes for climate modelling. This information supports federal decision making on climate change mitigation and adaptation.
Clean Air Agenda Theme: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda
1.3.2 Ecosystem Assessment and ApproachesAnalysis in support of regulations

Planned spending for 2013–2014:  $1.37 million
Advice and technical support to environmental assessments.
2.1.2  Health-related Meteorological Information Data collection and reporting for atmospheric pollutants

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $7.90 million
Environment Canada expects to achieve several goals under the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI): to develop, in partnership with Health Canada, effective strategies and supporting activities for facilitating the implementation of the AQHI in New Brunswick, Ontario and Quebec; to improve modelling tools and data access in order to increase accuracy of AQHI forecasting; and to harness dissemination and social media technologies in order to increase the reach of the AQHI.

Work will continue to expand the AQHI service, with a focus on communities in the North.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramElectricity regulations 

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $1.38 million
In 2013–2014, Environment Canada will focus on implementing the coal-fired electricity generation regulations, which were published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in September 2012, and developing regulations for natural gas-fired electricity generation.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramEmissions-intensive trade-exposed (EITE) regulations 

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $3.51 million
In 2013–2014, specific activities will include the development implementation, of regulations and other instruments to reduce emissions of key air pollutants from the pulp and paper, aluminium, base metal smelter, cement, iron and steel, iron ore pellets, potash, chemicals, and fertilizer sectors; and continued discussions on regulatory approaches for addressing GHGs with the above-mentioned sectors as well as the lime sector. Some of these regulatory measures covering GHGs and air pollutant emissions are expected to be published in 2013–2014. 
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramTransportation regulations 

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $8.49 million
Work will continue with the United States on North American transportation standards for GHG emissions by finalizing and implementing standards for heavy-duty vehicles for model year 2014 and beyond, as well as continuing implementation of the light-duty vehicle regulations for the 2011–2016 model years and finalizing draft standards for passenger cars and light-duty trucks for model years 2017–2025, which were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in December 2012.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramOil and gas regulations

Planned spending for 2013–2014:  $3.13 million
To reduce emission levels, air pollutant and GHG emission requirements will be established, and regulations and other risk management instruments will be developed and promulgated.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramConsumer and commercial products regulations

Planned spending for 2013–2014:  $1.20 million
Volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been identified as a contributor to smog, which is harmful to health and the environment. Emissions of VOC from consumer and commercial products will be addressed through an evolving suite of control instruments, including amending the proposed VOC Concentration Limits for Certain Products Regulations. 
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramAnalysis in support of regulations

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $3.55 million
Economic analysis in support of regulations.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramAtmospheric research, monitoring and modelling

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $18.41 million

Greenhouse Gas and Aerosols (including Short-Lived Climate Pollutants) Monitoring and Modelling

  • Enhanced monitoring of GHGs and aerosols (including black carbon) and climate modelling to develop methods for the observations-based estimation of managed and unmanaged sources (carbon sources and sinks) and to provide improved understanding of the impact of GHGs and aerosols (including black carbon) on climate and related feedbacks from snow and ice.
  • Establish baselines and improve characterization of Canadian GHG emissions to contribute to the verification of domestic and international mitigation commitments and to support the development and evaluation of emission targets, inventories and regulations. Information is used to establish baselines from which environmental impacts can be assessed, and which can be used to determine progress on the implementation of regulations.

Air Quality Monitoring and Modelling

  • EC will undertake research, monitoring and modelling activities on air pollutants in order to contribute to the understanding of the impacts of emissions on human health and the environment. This will enhance knowledge and information associated with the long-range transport, transformation and deposition of pollutants; improve tools to support the development of air pollutant emissions regulations and ambient air quality standards; improve tools to predict and describe benefits resulting from policy and regulatory actions and compliance mechanisms; and enhance the understanding of source contributions and trends.
  • Emphasis will be placed on informing the Air Quality Management System (AQMS), as this system relies heavily on effective air quality monitoring and research results, on understanding transboundary movement of air pollutants, and on modelling and reporting. Atmospheric science activities will also inform Canadian commitments related to the Canada–United States Air Quality Agreement.   
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramHealth and environmental impacts of air pollutants

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $3.14 million

Expected achievements of this program include the following:

  • scientific evaluations of the biological impacts of acid deposition and mercury on aquatic biodiversity, and assessments of the health of wildlife species and their ecosystems in select Canadian environments through the use of various indicators;
  • wildlife effects and risk assessment components of national and international assessments of the impacts of mercury and acid deposition; and
  • increased understanding of the effectiveness of air pollutant regulation in protecting and/or improving the health of Canadian ecosystems.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramOil sands science

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $2.84 million
Working collaboratively with the Government of Alberta and other stakeholders to measure priority air contaminants in order to set the baseline and establish trends, to understand the contribution of the atmospheric deposition and transport of these contaminants, and to utilize air quality models (i.e. GEM-MACH) to predict the impacts of oil sands development.

Environment Canada will provide support to environmental assessments and other activities related to the oil sands cumulative effects program.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramScience integration, accountability and benefits of action

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $0.78 million
The delivery of air quality science and science advice related to substances (e.g. mercury) or atmospheric issues (e.g. smog) that describe sources and ambient concentrations and trends. This informs the analysis of impacts on Canadians’ health and environment and of forecasted benefits of regulatory actions and other measures to reduce emissions in Canada or from other countries.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramData collection and reporting for GHGs

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $7.71 million

Environment Canada’s objectives with respect to GHG monitoring and reporting include maintaining existing institutional capacity to deliver an enhanced monitoring, accounting and reporting system to produce an annual UN-compliant National Inventory Report (NIR) as well as domestic facility emissions reporting via the Greenhouse Gas Facility Reporting Program (GHGRP) to ensure compliance with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999).

The NIR achievements for 2013–2014 will include ongoing economic sector alignment and harmonized publication activities with the Emissions Trends Report and harmonized reporting with the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators and the GHGRP.

Preparation is also underway for the implementation of new United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) GHG reporting requirements negotiated internationally, including the following:

  • changes to GHG estimation processes (new global warming potentials) and the addition of a new gas (nitrogen trifluoride);
  • new sector-specific information to be reported (e.g. emissions from abandoned coal mines, new vehicle technologies); and
  • sector-specific changes to current estimation methodologies (e.g. harvested wood products).

The GHGRP achievements will include:

  • development of reporting requirements and publishing the annual Canada Gazette notice;
  • collection of 2012 data via the Single Window system and provision of support to GHGRP reporters through technical guidance, training, webinars and helpdesk; and
  • contributions to Canadian GHG biennial reporting and national communication submissions.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramData collection and reporting for atmospheric pollutants

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $0.57 million

Air pollution emissions inventory expected achievements include:

  • development and publication of comprehensive and accurate air pollutant emissions information for industrial and non-industrial sources (including the transportation sector), which supports the development, implementation and tracking of the progress of regulations and air quality management strategies;
  • development of emission estimates and support for the development of regulations and policies for mobile sources and fuels (i.e., on-road and off-road vehicles);
  • updated and published trends in comprehensive air pollutant inventories from 1985 to 2011; and
  • information and technical expertise to support the AQMS, BLIERs, and regulatory development with respect to air emissions.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramCross-cutting data collection and reporting

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $3.05 million

Expected achievements are as follows:

  • reduced duplication and administrative burden on industry for reporting data to support the implementation of the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) regulations, program and policy development; and reduced cost to Canadians;
  • improved consistency and efficiency of common/tombstone data reported to EC through a single-window reporting portal to support CARA decision making and implementation; and
  • expansion of Environment Canada’s Single Window (SW) system, taking into account the needs and requirements of CARA programs, systems, partners and users.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramGreenhouse gas policy

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $4.60 million

Expected achievements are linked to advancing the Government’s climate change priorities, including through the development and implementation of the Government’s sector-by-sector regulatory plan to reduce GHG emissions in Canada, aligned with the United States as appropriate, to contribute towards achieving Canada’s national GHG reduction target of 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Specifically, these include the following:

  • supporting the Government’s climate change agenda through the provision of strategic policy and economic analysis, advice, and coordination for the development of GHG regulations for the electricity, oil and gas, and emission-intensive and trade-exposed sectors,
  • the Government’s climate change agenda will also be supported through ongoing monitoring and analysis of existing and emerging provincial, regional and United States climate change initiatives and their implications for the development of federal climate policy; and
  • the provision of strategic policy analysis and coordination of federal work on short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), to support Canada’s engagement in various international fora on this issue.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramCross-cutting analysis

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $3.13 million
  • Economic modelling, analysis and research in order to support informed federal decision making on policy approaches to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions and to analyze the competitiveness impacts of these approaches.
  • Environment Canada will identify opportunities for streamlining reporting processes and generating efficiencies by integrating with other related government-wide initiatives–such as the FSDS.
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramAtmospheric pollutants policy

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $2.42 million

Expected achievements are linked to implementing the new Air Quality Management System (AQMS), including the development and implementation of regulations and other instruments to reduce air pollutant emissions from key industries and efforts to manage air quality at a national level.

Expected achievements include the following:

  • implementing measures to reduce air pollutant emissions from boilers and heaters in the oil and gas, electricity, pulp and paper, mining and processing, and chemicals and fertilizer sectors;
  • establishing Canadian ambient air quality standards for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ground-level ozone and updating standards for nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide;
  • implementing a framework to address transboundary issues and to monitor and report on the AQMS;
  • further addressing North American transboundary air pollution through dialogue with the United States on a possible annex to the Air Quality Agreement to address particulate matter; and
  • participating in trilateral air quality initiatives under the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation.
3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – PollutionCompliance promotion and enforcement

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $6.68 million

The expected achievements over the length of the Clean Air Agenda (CAA) include greater industry compliance and enforcement of the regulations implemented under the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA). More specifically, the key expected achievements are as follows:

  • development of compliance strategies and compliance promotion plans for new or amended CARA instruments;
  • development of compliance promotion material and regional delivery of compliance promotion activities for  small and medium enterprises, First Nations and the Federal House (when required) for new and amended CARA instruments;
  • delivery of compliance promotion training to compliance promotion officers on new CARA requirements;
  • delivery of sound advice and guidance to risk managers to support the development and implementation of CARA instruments;
  • coordination of compliance promotion and enforcement activities to ensure complementary activities;
  • measures to ensure the effective use of information management tools for reporting on activities and results concerning CARA instruments; and
  • delivery of sound science and technical expertise to support the development and implementation of CARA instruments.
4.1.1 Governance and Management SupportAnalysis in support of regulations

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $0.90 million
Legal analysis in support of regulations.
Clean Air Agenda Theme: Clean Transportation
3.2.1 Climate Change and Clean Air Regulatory ProgramMarine Sector Regulatory Initiative

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $2.08 million
Environment Canada will administer new marine fuel standards finalized under the current Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulations of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999). In addition, Environment Canada will continue to work with Transport Canada to develop global standards at the International Maritime Organization to limit air pollutant and GHG emissions from marine shipping, will undertake work to assess the emission reduction potential of new technologies for ships, and will continue to assess the impact of air pollutant emissions from ships operating in the Canadian Arctic.
Clean Air Agenda Theme: International Actions
3.2.2 International Climate Change and Clean Air PartnershipsInternational climate change participation and negotiations

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $4.53 million

Canada will continue its strategic participation in a range of international climate fora within and outside the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change process, including multilateral and bilateral meetings.

These achievements are expected over the 2011–2016 time frame:

  • Outcomes of international negotiations and initiatives will be consistent with Canada’s interests and priorities.
  • Canadian interests are protected and advanced in both existing and new agreements, and through participation in key bilateral and multilateral partnerships.
3.2.2 International Climate Change and Clean Air PartnershipsInternational climate obligations

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $0.34 million
In 2013–2014, the expected achievement is the provision of the Government of Canada’s contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for the IPCC’s 2014 fiscal year and the provision of the Government of Canada’s contribution to the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) for its 2013–2014 fiscal year.

The expected overall achievement of this program is for the Government of Canada to contribute to the overall functioning of the IPCC and the IAI and their ongoing work to produce policy-relevant scientific information on climate change.
3.2.2 International Climate Change and Clean Air PartnershipsEngagement and alignment with the United States

Planned spending for 2013–2014: $0.85 million

The overall objective of the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED), initiated in 2009, is to enhance bilateral collaboration with the United States on the development and deployment of clean energy technologies in order to reduce GHG emissions and address climate change.

Expected achievements for 2013–2014:

  • Collaborate with the United States on shared clean energy priorities that contribute to the advancement of Canada’s domestic clean energy agenda.
  • Advance implementation of CED Action Plan II and associated projects within the three bilateral working groups.
  • Communicate progress and achievements on the CED website.
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