The 2010 Statistics for the International Movements of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material

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In 2010, the total quantity of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material imported into Canada decreased while the material exported from Canada increased slightly from the previous year (Figure 1). The total quantity of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material transiting through Canada has been increasing since 2006 (Figure 1), likely due to compliance promotion activities since the coming into force of the EIHWHRMR in 2005.

Figure 1
Exports, Imports and Transits of Hazardous Waste
and Hazardous Recyclable Material 20012010

Figure 1 Exports, Imports and Transits of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material 2001-2010

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1. Imports

The total imported quantity of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material decreased by 25%, from approximately 477 088 metric tonnes in 2009 to 358 007 metric tonnes in 2010 (Figure 1). Of the total imported quantity, 59% was hazardous recyclable material destined for recycling, while the remaining 41% was hazardous waste destined for disposal (Figure 2).

Figure 2
Type of Operation for 2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Waste
and Hazardous Recyclable Material

Figure 2 Type of Operation for 2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material

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More than 99% of the imported quantity of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material came from the United States. The remaining imports came from countries such as New Zealand, Great Britain and Germany, which were mostly hazardous recyclable material destined for metal recovery operations.

Spent or used lead acid batteries, lubricating oils, and metal and mineral wastes made up the majority of the hazardous recyclable material imported in 2010. Other types of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material imported in 2010 include corrosive liquids and organic solvents.

The majority of imports of hazardous waste destined for disposal either underwent physical or chemical treatment (38%), were incinerated on land (28%), or were sent to specially engineered landfills (24%) (Figure 3). As for the hazardous recyclable materials imported in 2010, the majority was destined for recovery of metals and metal compounds (61%) and re-refining or reuse of used oil (24%) (Figure 4).

Figure 3
2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Waste by Disposal Operation

Figure 3 2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Waste by Disposal Operation

Figure 4
2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Recyclable Material by Recycling Operation

Figure 4 2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Recyclable Material by Recycling Operation

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In 2010, imports of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material were destined to six Canadian provinces, with Ontario and Quebec receiving nearly 95% of all imports into Canada. The other four provinces that received imports of hazardous waste and hazardous recyclable material were Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. No imports of hazardous waste or hazardous recyclable material were made into any of the territories or other provinces (Figure 5).

Figure 5
Comparison of 2009/2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Waste
and Hazardous Recyclable Material by Province

Figure 5 Comparison of 2009/2010 Canadian Imports of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material by Province

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