Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

Access PDF (1.20 MB)

In 2014, nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions were 1923 kilotonnes (kt), a decrease of 16 kt (1%) from 2013 emission levels. The level of NOX emissions in 2014 was 930 kt (33%) lower than in 1990.

The decline in NOX emissions is mostly attributable to two factors: a reduction in emissions from transportation, given the progressive introduction of cleaner technology and fuels for vehicles; and a reduction in emissions from electricity generation as a result of regulations and domestic and international agreements. Decreases also occurred in emissions emitted from industry as a whole, with the exception of the oil and gas industry that experienced growth between 1990 and 2014.

Nitrogen oxide emissions, Canada, 1990 to 2014

Line chart

Long description

The line chart shows nitrogen oxide emissions in Canada from 1990 to 2014.

Data for this chart
Nitrogen oxide emissions, Canada, 1990 to 2014
YearNitrogen oxides
(annual national emissions in kilotonnes)
19902852.1
19912727.4
19922742.0
19932737.4
19942811.8
19952800.3
19962785.9
19972859.1
19982838.3
19992828.8
20002778.6
20012687.6
20022644.2
20032637.0
20042506.3
20052450.4
20062351.1
20072341.3
20082258.7
20092086.4
20102162.4
20112106.0
20121988.6
20131938.4
20141922.5

Download data file (Excel/CSV; 802 B)

How this indicator was calculated

Note: The indicator only reports air pollutant emissions from human-related sources.
Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada (2016) Air Pollutant Emission Inventory.

Sources of nitrogen oxide emissions

In 2014, transportation (road, rail, air and marine) was the major contributor to Canada's NOX emissions, representing 42% (807 kt). The oil and gas industry emitted the next largest proportions of national NOX emissions, representing 23% (446 kt), followed by off-road vehicles with 13% (242 kt). Between 1990 and 2014, the source that had the largest reduction (613 kt) in NOX emissions was transportation (road, rail, air and marine) while the oil and gas industry is the only sector having experienced an increase (125 kt).

Nitrogen oxide emissions by source, Canada, 1990 to 2014

Stacked area chart

Long description

The stacked area chart shows nitrogen oxide emissions in Canada by source for the years 1990 to 2014. The emissions are expressed in kilotonnes.

Data for this chart
Nitrogen oxide emissions by source, Canada, 1990 to 2014
YearTransportation
(road, rail, air, marine)
(emissions in kilotonnes)
Oil and gas industry
(emissions in kilotonnes)
Off-road vehicles
(emissions in kilotonnes)
Fuel for electricity and heating
(emissions in kilotonnes)
Other sources
(emissions in kilotonnes)
19901420.2320.9436.1310.8364.1
19911337.4312.7421.2304.7351.4
19921331.5325.6423.6315.9345.4
19931300.5348.6436.7297.6353.9
19941333.2378.7443.5293.9362.5
19951275.1393.4466.0303.8362.1
19961202.2403.9492.7329.0358.2
19971206.9445.9501.3344.6360.4
19981218.5455.6450.8358.3355.1
19991197.5472.9445.4356.5356.4
20001212.0418.0423.5371.8353.4
20011217.4412.0361.1357.7339.4
20021158.3410.4352.2364.8358.5
20031109.2463.3364.0353.0347.6
20041081.3397.1372.0321.6334.2
20051067.3396.4363.0309.3314.4
20061035.5417.2339.2283.7275.4
20071008.4429.4345.1302.2256.2
2008965.5439.1336.8287.2230.1
2009870.4440.6314.8258.2202.4
2010881.9434.2346.0290.2210.1
2011872.4448.7313.2260.5211.1
2012853.0440.0270.3222.2203
2013826.5437.1254.2218.7201.8
2014807.3445.9241.9223.4203.9

Download data file (Excel/CSV; 2.52 KB)

How this indicator was calculated

Note: The indicator only reports air pollutant emissions from human-related sources. "Other sources" include home firewood burning, incineration and miscellaneous, other industries, and open sources (e.g., landfills). Consult table 1 in the Data Sources and Methods for a complete list of the air pollutant emissions sources included under each category.
Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada (2016) Air Pollutant Emission Inventory.

Nitrogen oxides emissions by province and territory

Alberta was the province with the highest proportion of NOX emissions, with 36% (685 kt) of national emissions (1923 kt). The oil and gas industry emitted the largest amount of NOX for this province. Ontario contributed the second-largest proportion of NOX, with 16% (316 kt) of national emissions. British Columbia ranked third, with 14% (276 kt) of national emissions. In both Ontario and British Columbia, transportation (road, rail, air and marine) was the most important source of NOX emissions. The oil and gas industry was also an important source of NOX emissions in British Columbia. Off-road vehicles were the second most important source in Ontario. Ontario experienced the largest reduction in emissions level (433 kt) between 1990 and 2014 mainly due to emission reductions from transportation and electricity power-generating plants.

Nitrogen oxide emissions by province and territory, Canada, 1990, 2000 and 2014

Bar chart

Long description

The bar chart shows 1990, 2000 and 2014 nitrogen oxide emissions in Canada by province and territory.

Data for this chart
Nitrogen oxide emissions by province and territory, Canada, 1990, 2000 and 2014
Province or territory1990
(emissions in kilotonnes)
2000
(emissions in kilotonnes)
2014
(emissions in kilotonnes)
Newfoundland and Labrador100.780.263.8
Prince Edward Island12.59.75.6
Nova Scotia98.8101.372.4
New Brunswick80.275.336.2
Quebec402.4367.5229.8
Ontario748.2670.0315.7
Manitoba110.895.258.8
Saskatchewan248.2241.0158.2
Alberta721.9788.4685.0
British Columbia299.6324.6275.8
Yukon5.33.21.9
Northwest Territories and Nunavut23.422.219.1

Download data file (Excel/CSV; 954 B)

How this indicator was calculated

Note: The indicator only reports air pollutant emissions from human-related sources.
Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada (2016) Air Pollutant Emission Inventory.

Nitrogen oxide emissions from facilities

Environment and Climate Change Canada's National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) provides detailed information on air pollutant emissions from industrial and commercial facilities. The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides access to this information through an online interactive map.

With the CESI interactive map, you can zoom in to local areas and obtain details on NOX emissions specific to reporting facilities.

Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada (2016) National Pollutant Release Inventory Online Data Search – Facility Reported Data.

Related indicators

Other information

Date modified: