Skip booklet index and go to page content

Consultation Document: Proposed Regulatory Measures on Hydrofluorocarbons

Chemical Production Division
Environment Canada
Winter 2015

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
    1. Objectives
    2. “One-for-one” rule and small business lens
    3. Submission of comments
  2. Background
    1. Why we need action
    2. Current uses
    3. Existing management of HFCs in Canada
    4. Other jurisdictions
      1. United States
      2. European Union
      3. Japan
  3. Proposed Risk Management
    1. Risk management objective
    2. Proposed Option 1: Sector-specific prohibitions
      1. Foam blowing
      2. Commercial refrigeration
      3. Motor vehicle air conditioning
      4. Aerosols
    3. Proposed Option 2: Phase-down approach
    4. “Hybrid” Approach
  4. Next Steps

I. Introduction

  1. Objectives
  2. “One-for-one” rule and small business lens
  3. Submission of comments

On September 23, 2014, at the United Nations Climate Summit in New York City, Canada announced that it would publish a “Notice of Intent to Regulate Hydrofluorocarbons” (HFCs). Following through on that commitment, on December 6, 2014, Environment Canada published the Notice of Intent in Part I of the Canada Gazette. Interested parties had until January 16, 2015 to provide their preliminary comments on the contents of the Notice.

This Consultation Document is intended to stimulate discussion and give stakeholders an opportunity to provide comments on the proposed regulatory measures on hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) before they are published in the Canada Gazette, Part I.

Two proposed approaches are put forward for discussion to regulate HFCs:

  1. Prohibitions on specific HFCs by specific years depending on the sector; and
  2. a gradual phase-down of HFCs from a calculated baseline.

The first proposed approach would target the foam-blowing, commercial refrigeration, mobile air-conditioning and aerosol sectors, similar to the U.S proposal published in August 2014. Details of the proposals for each sector are outlined in Annexes 1-4 of this document. Requirements would apply to:

  • importers of specific HFCs to be used in the original equipment manufacture of certain products;
  • manufacturers of certain products that contain or are designed to contain specific HFCs; and
  • importers of certain products that contain or are designed to contain specific HFCs.

The second proposed approach was not included in the Notice of Intent published in December 2014. However, as Environment Canada received comments from several stakeholders on the Notice of Intent indicating a preference for a phase-down approach, this option is also being put forward for discussion and consideration.

The second option proposes a gradual phase-down modeled after the proposed amendment to the Montreal Protocol to include a phase-down of HFCs put forward by Canada, Mexico and the United States (i.e. North American ProposalFootnote1). Similar to the approach taken to phase-out ozone-depleting substances (i.e., chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs)), requirements would apply to the production and consumption of HFCs in bulk.

Both options will take into consideration:

  • the objective of curbing the growth of HFC consumption and use, thereby avoiding future emissions; and
  • the availability of acceptable alternatives to HFCs.

Proposed regulatory measures on HFCs under both options will be made pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA, 1999).

Readers are asked to review this document carefully -- in particular, the detailed proposals for Options 1 and option2 outlined in Part III and Annexes 1 to 5. These options are not mutually exclusive. A “hybrid” approach combining elements of the two options may also be considered. Readers are invited to provide written feedback as described in section C of Part I.

A. Objectives

These consultations are intended to ensure that the proposed approach and regulatory measures are as effective and straightforward as possible and that protection of the environment and human health is enhanced.

Environment Canada is committed to ensuring that all initiatives aimed at developing regulatory measures include a process of meaningful and effective consultation with stakeholders. As such, stakeholders are invited to contribute to the development of regulatory measures.

The proposed regulatory measures may cause the regulated community and governments to incur direct adjustment costs. In addition to environmental benefits, the regulatory measures may also result in benefits to the economy by attracting knowledge-based investments, such as environmentally-friendly alternatives.

The consultations are an opportunity for Environment Canada to obtain information on the costs and benefits of the proposed regulatory measures to Canadians and to Canadian industry.  This feedback will inform economic costs and benefits that will be shared with stakeholders and the public as part of the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement that will accompany the publication of the final proposed regulatory measures.

B. “One-for-one” rule and small business lens

The federal government has implemented a “One-for-one” rule to reduce administrative burden on business (i.e., the time and resources spent by business to comply with government regulations). The “One-for-one” rule requires that regulatory changes that increase administrative burden on business be offset with equal administrative burden reductions from within existing regulations in the Environment portfolio. The rule further requires departments to consult affected businesses on the estimated administrative burden prior to seeking approval to publish draft Regulations.

If the proposed regulatory measures have a significant impact on small business, the federal government will take special care to ensure that small business needs and capacities are considered. This will be achieved through the analysis of small business realities and consultation at the earliest stages of regulatory design. Consideration will be given to approaches that minimize costs for small business.

Because the regulatory measures are not final at this point, a full understanding of the administrative burden and impacts on small business is not possible. Should these impacts materialize once the proposed regulatory measures have been finalized, Environment Canada will consult with affected businesses before publishing the proposed measures.

C. Submission of comments

A copy of this Consultation Document has been transmitted by e-mail to all known Canadian stakeholders, including representatives from other federal departments, provincial, territorial, industry, environmental groups, and public advocacy groups.

When formulating their comments, stakeholders are asked to consider both options and:

  • indicate a preferred option, including the possibility of a combination of the two approaches;
  • identify advantages and disadvantages, including environmental and economic considerations, of each option from their perspective; and
  • provide relevant information on the status of alternatives in relevant sectors.

Please send your comments on this Consultation Document in writing to either of the following addresses below no later than March 31, 2015:

Regular mail

E-mail

Manager
Ozone Layer Protection and Export Controls
Chemical Production Division
Environment Canada
Place Vincent Massey
351 Blvd St-Joseph, 11th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H3

Fax: 819-938-4218

OzoneProtectionPrograms@ec.gc.ca

Please type “Consultations on Regulatory Measures for HFCs” in the subject line

Following this consultation process, the next opportunity for stakeholders to comment on the proposed regulatory measures will be following their pre-publication of the regulatory measures in Part I of the Canada Gazette.

Return to Table of Contents


II. Background

  1. Why we need action
  2. Current uses
  3. Existing management of HFCs in Canada
  4. Other jurisdictions

A. Why we need action

Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were introduced on to the global market as replacements for ozone-depleting substances (ODS), such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), being phased out globally under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

HFCs are used primarily as coolants in refrigeration and air conditioning equipment in buildings, industrial operations, for air-conditioning in vehicles, as blowing agents in the manufacture of foams, and to a lesser extent in aerosols, as fire suppression agents and as solvents.

Although HFCs do not deplete the ozone layer, many are powerful greenhouse gases, with global warming potentials hundreds to thousands times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2).

In response to controls placed on ODS under the Montreal Protocol, the consumption and emissions of HFCs as ODS substitutes are projected to increase substantially in the coming decades. While HFCs only currently account for about 2% of global greenhouse gas emissions, if left uncontrolled, they could account for up to 9-20% of such emissions by 2050, making them an emerging concern because of their immediate and future impact on the climate.

Data collected by Environment Canada through different intiatives shows a significant increase in the introduction of HFCs in Canada between the years 2008 to 2012, confirming the growth of HFCs use and potential for increased emissions. A summary of the data is displayed below in Figures 1a and figure1b.

Overall, the total of HFCs introduced into Canada tripled from 2008 to 2012. The foams sector showed the most growth, with the rate of HFCs introduced in this sector increasing by a factor of almost 8.5 (900 tonnes in 2008 and 7600 tonnes in 2012). HFCs introduced in the aerosol sector increased by a factor of approximately 2.5 (400 tonnes in 2008 to 1050 tonnes in 2012). HFCs introduced in cooling applications rose by close to 50% from approximately 2800 tonnes in 2008 to approximately 4100 tonnes in 2012.

Figure 1a. HFCs Introduced into the Canadian Market from 2008 to 2012 (Tonnes)

Figure 1a: HFCs Introduced into the Canadian Market from 2008 to 2012 (Tonnes)
Description of Figure 1a

Stacked bar chart of quantities of hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, in tonnes, introduced into the Canadian market for each calendar year from 2008 to 2012 (unit for the vertical axis is tonnes and the horizontal axis shows the year from 2008 to 2012)

The total quantity introduced to the Canadian market for each year are represented by a bar. Each bar is further separated into the quantities for use in certain end-use sectors, giving the appearance of a stacked bar, with each end-use sector identified by a colour.

Starting from the bottom of the bar, the colours are:

  • Dark blue - Cooling
  • Red - Foam Blowing
  • Green - Aerosols
  • Light blue - Fire Suppression
  • Purple - Solvents/Sterilants

The fire suppression (light blue) and solvent/sterilants (purple) end-use sectors are not very significant and, as such, are not visible or barely visible on the stacked bar chart.

For 2008, the height of the stacked bar reaches just around 4300 tonnes with approximately 65% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 20% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at 10%.

For 2009, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 6400 tonnes with approximately 40% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 45% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at slightly more than 10%.

For 2010, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 9160 tonnes with approximately 36% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 52% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at approximately 10%.

For 2011, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 14200 tonnes with approximately 35% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 54% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at approximately 8%.

For 2012, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 14400 tonnes with approximately 40% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), almost 50% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at approximately 7%.

Figure 1b HFCs Introduced into the Canadian Market from 2008 to 2012 (Mega Tonnes CO2 equivalent)

Figure 1b. HFCs Introduced into the Canadian Market from 2008 to 2012 (Mega Tonnes CO2 eq)
Description of Figure 1b

Stacked bar chart of quantities of hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, in Megatonnes CO2equivalent (MT CO2eq), introduced into the Canadian market for each calendar year from 2008 to 2012 (unit for the vertical axis is MT CO2eq and the horizontal axis shows the year from 2008 to 2012)

The total quantity introduced to the Canadian market for each year are represented by a bar. Each bar is further separated into the quantities for use in certain end-use sectors, giving the appearance of a stacked bar, with each end-use sector identified by a colour.

Starting from the bottom of the bar, the colours are:

  • Dark blue - Cooling
  • Red - Foam Blowing
  • Green - Aerosols
  • Light blue - Fire Suppression
  • Purple - Solvents/Sterilants

The fire suppression (light blue) and solvent/sterilants (purple) end-use sectors are not very significant and, as such, are not visible or barely visible on the stacked bar chart.

For 2008, the height of the stacked bar reaches just around 8.6 MtCO2eq with over 80% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 10% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at 10%.

For 2009, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 10.4 MTCO2eq with approximately 60% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 34% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at approximately 3%.

For 2010, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 14.1 MTCO2eq with approximately 58% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 37% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at approximately 2.5%.

For 2011, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 21.7 MTCO2eq with approximately 50% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), 43% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at approximately 2.5%.

For 2012, the height of the stacked bar reaches around 21.4  MTCO2eq with approximately 54% represented by cooling uses (dark blue), almost 40% represented by foam blowing uses and the remainder representing aerosols (red) at just over 3%. 

B. Current uses

HFCs are not manufactured in Canada but are imported in bulk and in manufactured items such as cooling systems, foam products and aerosols.

The cooling sector includes refrigeration and air-conditioning applications. Refrigeration can be further broken down into commercial refrigeration and domestic refrigeration. Commercial refrigeration includes equipment found in supermarkets, convenience stores, restaurants and other food service establishments. Domestic refrigeration includes equipment manufactured for household use.

Air conditioning can be further broken down into mobile and stationary air conditioning. Mobile air conditioning includes systems in vehicles, while stationary air conditioning includes residential and commercial air conditioning units.

Foam-blowing products include, among other things, insulating foam, packaging materials and rigid insulating foams used in construction. Aerosols may include personal use products such as body sprays, deodorants and medical products such as metered dose inhalers (MDIs).

C. Existing management of HFCs in Canada

Environment Canada has some domestic measures in place to minimize emissions of HFCs from equipment that is in use; however, none of these actions prevent the entry of these substances into the market or limit growth in their usage.

Federal and provincial/territorial regulations prohibit the release of HFCs used in refrigeration, air conditioning systems, solvents and fire extinguishing. Controls include requirements such as proper labeling and handling of equipment containing HFCs, requirements to train equipment service providers and methods to be used to install, service, repair or decommission equipment containing HFCs.

A federal Environmental Code of Practice for the Elimination of Fluorocarbon Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Systems has also been developed. The main purpose of the Code is to provide guidelines for preventing atmospheric emissions of ODS and their halocarbon alternatives used in refrigeration and air conditioning applications through the establishment of best management practices.

D. Other jurisdictions

i. United States

On August 6, 2014, the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency announced a proposed rulemaking under their Significant New Alternatives Policy Program. Under the proposed rule, various HFCs and HFC-containing blends that were previously listed as acceptable alternatives to ozone-depleting substances will be listed as unacceptable for some uses, and as such would be prohibited for those uses. This proposal is based on information showing that substitutes that pose lower risk overall to human health and/or the environment are available for the same uses. The sectors targeted in the proposal include consumer aerosols, foam blowing end uses, commercial refrigeration and motor vehicle air conditioning.

Environment Canada recognizes the importance of regulatory alignment between Canada and the U.S. and of ensuring a level playing field for Canadian and U.S. companies and enterprises. Environment Canada will consider different approaches that minimize potential market disruption and work towards the objective of curbing HFC growth thereby avoiding future emissions, while taking Canadian environmental and economic factors into account.

Ongoing non-regulatory activities in the U.S. include the Green Chill Partnership for commercial refrigeration and best practices for household refrigerator and freezer producers.

ii. European Union

To control emissions from fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases), including HFCs, the European Union (EU) has adopted two legislative acts:

  1. the Mobile Air-conditioning (MAC) Directive on air conditioning systems used in small motor vehicles, and
  2. the F-gas Regulation (2006) which covers all other key applications in which F-gases are used.

The F-gas Regulation follows two tracks of action: 1) improving the prevention of leaks from equipment containing F-gases and 2) avoiding the use of F-gases where environmentally superior alternatives are cost-effective.

In addition, from 2015, the volume of HFCs which can be placed on the EU market will be subject to quantitative limits which will be phased-down over time. Measures will also include restrictions on the marketing and use of certain products and equipment containing F-gases.

From January 2017, the MAC Directive stipulates a total ban of the use of F-gases with a GWP higher than 150 in all new vehicles put on the EU market. From that date forward, new vehicles with MAC systems using these gases cannot be registered, sold or serviced in the EU.

iii. Japan

In April 2013, Japan enacted a law updating their existing fluorocarbon regulation. The objective of the new legislation is to reduce HFC emissions through measures that cover the total life cycle of fluorocarbons from manufacture through disposal, as well as equipment using these gases. Among other requirements, entities manufacturing and importing air conditioning and refrigeration units are required to transition to either non-fluorinated gases or low-GWP fluorocarbons by certain years.

Return to Table of Contents


III. Proposed Risk Management

  1. Risk management objective
  2. Proposed Option 1: Sector-specific prohibitions
  3. Proposed Option 2: Phase-down approach
  4. “Hybrid” Approach

A. Risk management objective

The overall risk management objective for hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) is to limit growth of HFC use and consumption and avoid future emissions of HFCs, with the ultimate goal of minimizing their impact on the climate. 

As described in Part I, two proposed approaches to regulating HFCs are being considered to achieve the risk management objective.  These approaches are described in the following sections as Option 1 (sector-specific prohibitions) and Option 2 (gradual phase-down).

B. Proposed Option 1: Sector-specific prohibitions

Under Option 1, proposed regulatory measures for HFCs would prohibit specific HFCs by certain years, depending on the sector, and impact the following activities:

  • Import of certain HFCs in bulk for the original equipment manufacture (OEM) of certain products;
  • Import of certain products that contain or are designed to contain certain HFCs; and
  • Manufacture of certain products that contain or are designed to contain certain HFCs.

Proposed measures under Option 1 would target the following sectors:

  • Foam blowing;
  • Commercial refrigeration;
  • Motor vehicle air conditioning; and
  • Aerosols.

Taking action in the foam blowing, commercial refrigeration, motor vehicle air conditioning and aerosols sectors would be aimed at:

  • achieving significant environmental benefits (given that a considerable quantity of HFCs are used in these sectors and some HFCs are among those with the highest global warming potential (GWP)); and
  • aligning with U.S. measures to the extent possible.

In addition, existing information indicates that alternatives are available or are becoming available for certain end uses in the foam-blowing, air conditioning, refrigeration and aerosol sectors.

More details on the proposals under Option 1 are provided by sector in the next sections (i to iv).

i. Foam blowing

Foams are used in a variety of everyday applications, from building insulation to furniture cushions. They are produced by trapping a gas within a plastic resin. Closed cell (rigid) foams are often used for thermal insulation, increasing energy efficiency in residential, commercial and industrial buildings. Open cell (flexible) foams are softer and are often used in various consumer products, such as automotive interiors and shoe soles.

The proposed measures would prohibit:

  • the import of certain HFCs in bulk for manufacture of certain products, by 2017;
  • the manufacture of certain products where the HFC will be used as the foam blowing agent, by 2017; and
  • the import of certain products where the HFC has been used as the foam blowing agent, by 2017.

Use and sale of products that were manufactured or imported before the prohibition date would still be allowed.

Manufacture and import of foam products destined for export would be allowed.

Refer to Tables 1 and table2 in Annex 1 for more detail on the proposed measures for restrictions on foam products in certain end uses.

ii. Commercial refrigeration

Commercial refrigeration includes a wide variety of equipment mainly used to refrigerate food in supermarkets, convenience stores, restaurants and other food service establishments. It does not include the refrigeration of food prior to it reaching the retail sales sector, such as cold storage and food processing, which are usually considered to be industrial refrigeration, or transport refrigeration.

HFCs are used for both the manufacturing or local assembly of new equipment, and the servicing of existing equipment. Commercial refrigeration equipment is generally categorized in three different types of systems: stand-alone equipment, condensing units; and centralized systems.

The proposed measures would prohibit:

  • the import of certain HFCs in bulk for original equipment manufacture (OEM) of certain types of commercial refrigeration equipment, by 2017;
  • the manufacture of certain commercial refrigeration equipment, that contains or is designed to contain specific HFCs, by 2017; and
  • the import of certain commercial refrigeration equipment that contains  or is designed to contain specific HFCs, by 2017.

Manufacture or import of a product that contains or is designed to contain any HFC destined for export would also be allowed.

The import, use and sale of any HFC in bulk for the servicing of equipment manufactured or imported before the prohibition date would still be allowed for the lifetime of the equipment.

Refer to Tables 3 and table4 in Annex 2 for details on the prohibition on certain HFCs in both new and retrofit commercial refrigeration equipment.

iii. Motor vehicle air conditioning

Motor vehicle air conditioners provide comfort cooling in driver or passenger compartments of passenger cars, light duty trucks, buses, and rail vehicles.  Vehicle air conditioners have an average lifetime of between 12-16 years. In Canada, the Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations allow automobile manufacturers to meet CO2 reduction targets by improving the efficiency of the motor vehicle air conditioning system and reducing refrigerant leakage.

The proposed measures would be complementary to the above mentioned Regulations as they would more specifically prohibit:

  • the import of certain HFCs in bulk intended for use in motor vehicle air conditioning systems, by model year 2021;
  • the manufacture of motor vehicles that contain or is designed to contain certain HFCs, by model year 2021; and
  • the import of motor vehicles that contain or are designed to contain certain HFCs, by model year 2021.

The manufacture and import of motor vehicles that contain or are designed to contain certain HFCs destined destined for export would be allowed.

The import, use and sale of HFCs in bulk for the purpose of servicing of air-conditioning systems in motor vehicles with a model year that is before the prohibited model year would be allowed.

Refer to Table 6 in Annex 3 for more detail the prohibitions, with associated timelines, on HFCs in the motor vehicle air conditioning sector.

iv. Aerosols

Aerosol products use liquefied or compressed gas to propel active ingredients in liquid, paste, or powder form in precise spray patterns with controlled droplet sizes and amounts. Typical aerosol products use a propellant that is a gas at atmospheric pressure, but is a pressurized liquid in the can. Non-medical commercial aerosols can be broken down into two product categories, namely consumer aerosols and technical aerosols. HFCs used in medical aerosols would be exempt from controls as this use remains critical.

The proposed measures would prohibit, with certain exceptions:

  • the import of HFCs in bulk for the manufacture of certain aerosol product, by 2017;
  • the manufacture of aerosol products that contain  or are designed to contain specific HFCs, by 2017; and
  • the import of aerosol products that contain specific HFCs, by 2017.

The manufacture and import of aerosol products destined for export would be allowed.The use and sale of aerosol products manufactured or imported before the prohibition date would be allowed.

Refer to Tables 7-10 in Annex 4 for more detail on the proposed measures for prohibitions on the aerosol sector containing certain HFCs and applicable exceptions.

C. Proposed Option 2: Phase-down approach

A gradual phase-down would be modeled after the proposed amendment to the Montreal Protocol to include a phase-down of HFCs put forward by Canada, Mexico and the United States (i.e. North American Proposal). Similar to the proven and successful approach taken to phase-out ozone-depleting substances (i.e., chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs)), requirements would apply to the production and consumption of HFCs in bulk, whether alone or in a mixture (blend).

The key elements of a phase-down approach would:

  • Include a list of HFCs  subject to the phase-down (refer to Annex 5);
  • Use global warming potential-weighting to establish a baseline and consumptionFootnote2 allowances (as compared to the ozone-depleting potential-weighting used for ozone-depleting substances); and
  • Establish a schedule for a phase-down of consumptionFootnote2 from a calculated baseline.
Sample Schedule for a Phase-down of Consumption
TimingPotential Reduction Step from Calculated Baseline
by 2018
10%
by 2023
35%
by 2029
70%
By 2035
85%

Similar to the 2014 North American Proposal, the baseline would be calculated from a combination of HFC plus HCFC consumption and production respectively, averaged over 2008 to 2010). The current baseline calculation under the North American Proposal is shown below.

(Average HCFC consumption over 2008-2010 in Tonnes CO2eq) X (85%)
+
(Average HFC consumption over 2008-2010 in Tonnes CO2eq)
 =

HFC Consumption Baseline in Tonnes CO2

Based on this baseline calculation, consumption allowances would be issued only to those companies that manufactured or consumed HCFCs and/or HFCs during at least one of the years between 2008 and 2010.

D.  “Hybrid” Approach

A hybrid approach would combine a phase-down of consumption from a calculated baseline with prohibitions on the manufacture and import of products that contain or are designed to contain certain HFCs.

This approach was used in the Ozone–depleting Substances Regulations, 1998, which, among other things:

  • implements an HCFC consumption phase-out schedule; and
  • prohibits the manufacture and import of certain HCFCs and products that contain or are designed to contain HCFCs.
Footnote 2

Consumption = manufacture + import - export

Return to first footnote 2referrer

Return to Table of Contents


IV. Next Steps

In drafting the proposed regulatory measures, Environment Canada will review and take into consideration all comments received from interested and affected parties in response to this consultation document and consultation sessions.

The regulatory measures will then be published for public comment in Part I of the Canada Gazette.

Return to Table of Contents

Annex 1: Option 1: Proposal for the Foam Blowing Sector

Table 1: Proposed Timeline for Prohibitions on Foam Blowing Sector

Timeline: All activities described in Table 2 would be prohibited by 2017 and beyond

Exception: Products containing any HFC for military, space or aeronautical applications are excluded from the prohibitions set out in Table 2.

 

Table 2: Proposed Prohibitions on HFCs in Foam Blowing Sector by Activity
End UseImport of HFCs in bulk for OEM of products intended for the specified end useManufacture of products intended for the specified end use, where the HFC is to be used as the foam blowing agentImport of products intended for the specified end use, where the HFC has been used as the foam blowing agent
spray foam applications
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-134a
flexible polyurethane
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
rigid polyurethane appliance foam
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
rigid polyurethane: spray
  • HFC-134a
  • Formacel TI
  • HFC-134a
  • Formacel TI
  • HFC-134a
  • Formacel TI
rigid polyurethane: commercial refrigeration and sandwich panels
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
rigid polyurethane slabstock
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
Rigid polyurethane and polyisocyanurate laminated boardstock
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
integral skin polyurethane
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
polystyrene (extruded sheet)
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • Formacel Z6
polystyrene: extruded boardstock and billet
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa Formacel B
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel B
  • Formacel Z-6
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel B
  • Formacel Z-6
polyolefin
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • Formacel TI
phenolic insulation board and bunstock
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-143a
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-143a
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-365mfc
  • HFC-245fa
  • HFC-143a

Return to Table of Contents


Annex 2: Option 1: Proposal for the Commercial Refrigeration Sector

Table 3: Proposed Timeline for Commercial Refrigeration Sector

Timeline: All activities detailed in Tables 4 and table5 would be prohibited by 2017 and beyond

 

Table 4: Proposed Prohibitions on HFCs in Commercial Refrigeration Sector by Activity Applying to New Equipment
Equipment Type
(new equipment)
Import of HFCs in bulk for OEM of specified equipment type designed to contain the specified HFCManufacture of specified equipment type designed to contain the specified HFCImport of specified equipment type – contains or is designed to contain  the specified HFC
Stand-alone Equipment
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
Condensing Units
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
Direct Supermarket Systems
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
Indirect Supermarket Systems
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
Vending Machines
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-134a
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
Table 5: Proposed Prohibitions on HFCs in Commercial Refrigeration Sector Applying to Retrofit Equipment by Activity
Equipment Type
(retrofit equipment)
Import of HFCs in bulk for OEM of specified equipment type designed to contain the specified HFCManufacture of specified equipment type designed to contain the specified HFCImport of specified equipment type – contains or is designed to contain  the specified HFC
Stand-alone Equipment
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
Condensing Units
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
Direct Supermarket Systems
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
Indirect Supermarket Systems
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-227ea
  • HFC-407B
  • HFC-421B
  • HFC-422A
  • HFC-422C
  • HFC-422D
  • HFC-428A
  • HFC-434A
Vending Machines
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A
  • HFC-507A
  • HFC-404A

Return to Table of Contents


Annex 3: Option 1: Proposal for the Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector

Table 6: Proposed Prohibitions on HFCs in Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning Sector by Activity
HFCImport of HFCs in bulk intended for use in motor vehicle air-conditioning systemsManufacture of motor vehicles designed to contain the specified HFCImport of motor vehicles containing the specified HFC
HFC-134aProhibited in 2021 model year and beyondProhibited in 2021 model year and beyondProhibited in 2021 model year and beyond

Return to Table of Contents


Annex 4: Option 1: Proposal for the Aerosol Sector

Table 7: Proposed Timeline for Prohibitions on Aerosol Sector

Timeline: All activities detailed in Tables 8, table9 and table10 would be prohibited by 2017 and beyond

Table 8: Proposed Prohibitions on HFC-125 in Aerosol Sector

Import of HFC in bulk for manufacture of aerosol products: Prohibited

Manufacture of aerosols that contain or are designed to contain HFC-125: Prohibited

Import of aerosols that contain or are designed to contain HFC-125: Prohibited

Exceptions: None

Table 9: Proposed Prohibitions on HFC-227ea in Aerosol Sector

Import of HFC in bulk for manufacture of aerosol products: Prohibited

Manufacture of aerosols that contain or are designed to contain HFC-227ea: Prohibited

Import of aerosols that contain or are designed to contain HFC-227ea: Prohibited

Exceptions: metered-dose inhalers (MDIs)

Table 10: Proposed Prohibitions on HFC-134a in Aerosol Sector

Import of HFC in bulk for manufacture of aerosol products: Prohibited

Manufacture of aerosols that contain or are designed to contain HFC-134a: Prohibited

Import of aerosols that contain or are designed to contain HFC-134a: Prohibited

Exceptions:

  • metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) for the treatment asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, allergic rhinitis and other diseases where aerosols can be used for systemic delivery through lung, nose, or other organs;
  • wound care sprays;
  • topical coolant sprays for pain alleviation;
  • products for removing bandage adhesives from skin;
  • cleaning products for removal of grease, flux and other soils from electrical equipment or electronics;
  • lubricants for electrical equipment or electronics;
  • sprays for aircraft maintenance;
  • pesticides for use near electrical wires, in aircraft, in total release insecticide foggers, or in certified organic use pesticides for which EPA has specifically disallowed all other low-GWP propellants;
  • mold release agents;
  • lubricants and cleaners for spinnerettes for synthetic fabrics;
  • duster sprays specifically for removal of dust from photographic negatives, semiconductor chips and specimens under electron microscopes;
  • document preservation sprays

Return to Table of Contents


Annex 5: Option 2: Phase-down Approach

Table 11: Hydrofluorocarbons Proposed to Be Subject to a Phase-down
No.Substance100-year Global Warming Potential
(Fourth Assessment Report)
1
HFC-23
14800
2
HFC-32
675
3
HFC-41
92
4
HFC-125
3500
5
HFC-134
1100
6
HFC-134a
1430
7
HFC-143
353
8
HFC-143a
4470
9
HFC-152
53
10
HFC-152a
124
11
HFC-161
12
12
HFC-227ea
3220
13
HFC-236cb
1340
14
HFC-236ea
1370
15
HFC-236fa
9810
16
HFC-245ca
693
17
HFC-245fa
1030
18
HFC-365mfc
794
19
HFC-43-10mee
1640

Return to Table of Contents

Date modified: